Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMcColl, Stephanie
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2015-02-01 17:52:18.674en
dc.date2015-02-05 16:09:27.794en
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-05T21:18:02Z
dc.date.available2015-02-05T21:18:02Z
dc.date.issued2015-02-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/12734
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Gender Studies) -- Queen's University, 2015-02-05 16:09:27.794en
dc.description.abstract"#surrogacy: Confronting the coloniality of Twitter and contemporary transnational surrogacy practices in India" begins to think about how the racial histories of modernity provide a lens to consider transnational surrogacy in India. My thesis aims to unpack the complex dynamics that exist between contemporary commercial surrogacy practices, social media, archiving, and Western colonialism. This conceptual project is divided into three parts (historical, conceptual and empirical) to allow for a nuanced examination of colonial archives, the embedded colonial 'logic' and tropes in these archives, and the continuities of colonial and racialized histories that permit for an understanding of how and why India became the first transnational hub for commercial surrogacy. My scholarly work examines surrogacy and the racialized and gendered 'markings' of colonialism, as they intersect with modes of technology and transnationalism in the twenty-first century. Specifically, I seek to expose how Indian women's bodies are ever tied to colonial processes seen through transnational surrogacy transactions. This thesis spans historical moments as well as geographical and spatial locations as a means to necessarily articulate and conceptualize the coloniality of both surrogacy and Twitter. Here, the histories of transatlantic slavery, South Asian colonialism, and South Asian postcolonialism are pushed together to identify the dynamic workings of these tensions that allow us to think through our historical and colonial present. Namely, I am situating contemporary transnational surrogacy practices alongside the histories of racial violence, motherhood, and technology. The historical, conceptual and empirical frameworks being employed here encourage, and necessitate, broader and more complex thinking around transnational surrogacy practices. To extend the thinking around contemporary transnational surrogacy is my intention; to position surrogacy practices within the processes of racialization and colonization necessarily illuminates the often-overlooked histories and positionalities that frame the reproductive transactions.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectReproductive Tourismen_US
dc.subjectTransnationalismen_US
dc.subjectSocial Mediaen_US
dc.subjectCommercial Surrogacyen_US
dc.subjectSurrogate Motherhooden_US
dc.subjectTwitteren_US
dc.subjectRacial Historiesen_US
dc.subjectArchivingen_US
dc.subjectColonialismen_US
dc.subjectIndiaen_US
dc.subjectRacialized Womenen_US
dc.subjectAssisted Reproductive Technologiesen_US
dc.title#surrogacy: Confronting the coloniality of Twitter and contemporary transnational surrogacy practices in Indiaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeMasteren
dc.contributor.supervisorMorgensen, Scott Lauriaen
dc.contributor.departmentGender Studiesen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record