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dc.contributor.authorElliott, E. Judith
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2016-09-21 15:54:16.383en
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-21T21:51:41Z
dc.date.available2016-09-21T21:51:41Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-21
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/14924
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Geological Sciences & Geological Engineering) -- Queen's University, 2016-09-21 15:54:16.383en
dc.description.abstractThe feasibility of monitoring fluid flow subsurface processes that result in density changes, using the iGrav superconducting gravimeter, is investigated. Practical targets include steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) bitumen depletion and water pumping from aquifers, for which there is currently a void in low-impact, inexpensive monitoring techniques. This study demonstrates that the iGrav has the potential to be applied to multi-scale and diverse reservoirs. Gravity and gravity gradient signals are forward modeled for a real SAGD reservoir at two time steps, and for surface-fed and groundwater-fed aquifer pumping models, to estimate signal strength and directional dependency of water flow. Time-lapse gravimetry on small-scale reservoirs exhibits two obstacles, namely, a µgal sensitivity requirement and high noise levels in the vicinity of the reservoir. In this study, both limitations are overcome by proposing (i) a portable superconducting gravimeter, and (ii) a pair of instruments under various baseline geometries. This results in improved spatial resolution for locating depletion zones, as well as the cancellation of noise common in both instruments. Results indicate that a pair of iGrav superconducting gravimeters meet the sensitivity requirements and the spatial focusing desired to monitor SAGD bitumen migration at the reservoir scales. For SAGD reservoirs, the well pair separation, reservoir depth, and survey sampling determine the resolvability of individual well pair depletion patterns during the steam chamber rising phase, and general reservoir depletion patterns during the steam chamber spreading phase. Results show that monitoring water table elevation changes due to pumping and tracking whether groundwater or surface water is being extracted are feasible.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectaquiferen_US
dc.subjectgravity gradienten_US
dc.subjectsagden_US
dc.subjectmonitoringen_US
dc.subjectgravityen_US
dc.titleOn the feasibility of time-lapse superconducting gravimetry for reservoir monitoringen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeMasteren
dc.contributor.supervisorBraun, Alexanderen
dc.contributor.supervisorFotopoulos, Georgiaen
dc.contributor.departmentGeological Sciences and Geological Engineeringen


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