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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/6747

Title: A MIXED METHODS INVESTIGATION OF THE NEEDS, EXPERIENCES, AND FULFILLMENTS OF TRANS PERSONS ACCESSING ONTARIO HEALTH CARE SERVICES
Authors: COYLE, SHANNON

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Keywords: Health Care
Gender Studies
Issue Date: 22-Sep-2011
Series/Report no.: Canadian theses
Abstract: This study examined the societal factors and subjective beliefs that are hypothesized to be affecting the lives of trans persons accessing Ontario health care services. The purpose of this study was to uncover information pertaining to trans persons’ needs and fulfillments within Ontario’s health care system in order to discover what the specific health care needs of trans persons accessing health care services are as well as if they are alienated and/or systemically discriminated against when seeking medical attention. The research questions were addressed through a secure, anonymous, online questionnaire taking approximately 30 to 45 minutes to complete. A small sample of 18 to 26 individuals who identified as trans, living in Ontario and have accessed, or are currently accessing, Ontario health care services were recruited through relevant list-servs and website postings. Participants accessed a variety of open-ended and closed questions concerning sociodemographics, sexuality, health care access experiences, and health care needs. Qualitative results showed that access to Ontario health care is complicated by race, class and language for participants in this study. Experiences for trans persons with Ontario health care services varied from individual to individual; some reported no negative experiences at all, some have been refused services by the Center for Addiction and Mental Health’s Gender Identity Clinic, and some avoided health care services entirely due to discrimination from medical professionals.
Description: Thesis (Master, Gender Studies) -- Queen's University, 2011-09-20 12:42:59.005
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/6747
Appears in Collections:Gender Studies Graduate Theses
Queen's Theses & Dissertations

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