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dc.contributor.authorYao, Jianhua
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2012-06-18 17:01:26.92en
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-19T19:04:28Z
dc.date.issued2012-06-19
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/7279
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D, Sociology) -- Queen's University, 2012-06-18 17:01:26.92en
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation, using the tool of a political economy of communication analysis gives us an important way to conceptualize the challenges confronting Chinese media workers, especially editors, due to media reform and social transformation. I will accomplish this by examining three different but inter-related processes: commodification, structuration, and spatialization. First, I will analyze the ways in which the deepening of the media commodification process has forced Chinese media workers to serve the political interests of the state, and at the same time, to generate profit for their companies and promote political and social reforms. Second, I will explore the structuration process by analyzing how fundamental social, technological, political, and economic changes—especially those in class relations and power dynamics—have produced five critical problems for the Chinese media workers. Third, I will explore the media spatialization process by addressing its three indispensable components: globalization, neoliberalism, and the global division of labour. When China is increasingly integrated into the global political economy, most Chinese media workers have faced great changes in their value systems and their daily work processes. As a result, the privileged existence of workers as the “masters” of the Communist society has been transformed in many ways (Rocca 2003). In the last chapter, I will suggest plausible solutions to the problems of Chinese media workers, addressing the benefits of labour convergence, the basic functions and major limitations of worker organizations and trade unions, and how they can further help Chinese media workers better deal with the challenges associated with current media reform when labour unrest is on the rise. To conclude, this dissertation concentrates on the trajectories of the labour process transformation of Chinese media workers; their changing social, economic, and political roles; and their dilemma, challenges, and opportunities associated with current social reform and China’s more integration into the global political economy. Through the political economic analysis of Chinese media workers, I aim to better understand the broader social and economic transformations, particularly the network of power relations and institutional contexts in which Chinese media workers are situated, that have been taking place in China since the late 1970s.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectknowledge workeren_US
dc.subjectstructurationen_US
dc.subjectspatializationen_US
dc.subjectpolitical economyen_US
dc.subjectworker organizationen_US
dc.subjecttrade unionen_US
dc.subjectChinese media industryen_US
dc.subjectneoliberalismen_US
dc.subjectthe global division of labouren_US
dc.subjectcommodificationen_US
dc.titleThe Political Economy of Knowledge Workers in the Chinese Media Industryen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.restricted-thesisMy study includes case studies of two publishing houses in China, with 19 interviews with editors, union officials, and government officials. Most of the interviews concentrated on the Party control, censorship, and the declining social welfare of Chinese media workers, all of which are considered as very sensitive topics of Contemporary China.en
dc.description.degreePh.Den
dc.contributor.supervisorMosco, Vincenten
dc.contributor.departmentSociologyen
dc.embargo.terms1825en
dc.embargo.liftdate2017-06-18


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