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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/6392

Title: Canadian Football League Stadium Location: A Comparative Analysis of the Saskatchewan Entertainment Facility and Winnipeg Stadium
Authors: Assie, Scott

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Keywords: Professional
Stadia
Planning
Regina
Winnipeg
Site
Transportation and Accessibility
Land Use
Revitalization
Issue Date: 2011
Abstract: This report offers a comparison of the planning for two professional football stadia in Canada. The development of a new stadium has long-term consequences on a city’s land use pattern and economic activity. Although professional sporting venues rarely create positive direct economic impacts, urban planners can play a large role in locating such a facility to inspire civic pride, instil a sense of community and create a vibrant and dynamic urban environment near the venue. Since the direct economic benefits for these stadia rarely cover the large government subsidies involved the justification for public sector assistance sometimes depends on the facility’s ability to support the non-financial objectives such as community revitalization. The purpose of this study is to compare the planning for new professional football stadia in Regina and Winnipeg in terms of the specific site, transportation and accessibility issues, and surrounding land uses and to examine how each facility will likely function with respect to their local urban environment. Recommendations formulated following the analysis of the evaluation criteria are specific to each facility and may not be applicable to all cities. Rather, these recommendations may serve as best practice guidelines when considering the functional impact of future professional football stadia.
Description: A report submitted to the School of Urban and Regional Planning in conformity with the requirements for the degree of Master of Urban and Regional Planning
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/6392
Appears in Collections:Urban & Regional Planning Graduate Projects
Queen's Graduate Projects

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