Queen's University - Utility Bar

QSpace at Queen's University >
Theses, Dissertations & Graduate Projects >
Queen's Theses & Dissertations >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/6710

This item is restricted and will be released 2016-09-07.
Title: READING AND RESPONDING: FINDING AND MAKING MEANING IN THE LIFE WRITING OF DIASPORIC IRANIAN JEWISH WOMEN
Authors: JACKSON, LEORA A

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Jackson_Leora_A_201109_MA.pdf538.99 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
Keywords: book club
women
autobiography
trauma
Jewish
life-writing
Iran
cultural production
home
migration
trauma
diaspora
Issue Date: 9-Sep-2011
Series/Report no.: Canadian theses
Abstract: This project investigates the English-language life writing of diasporic Iranian Jewish women. It examines how these women have differentially imagined their diasporic lives and travels, and how they have in turn been imagined and accepted or rejected by their audiences. In the first chapter, I use “home” as a lens for understanding three distinct life writing texts, showing how the authors write about what it means to have a home and to be at home in contrasting and even contradictory ways. I show how, despite potential hegemonic readings that perpetuate unequal relationships and a normative definition of the ideal home, the texts are open to multiple contestatory readings that create spaces for new formulations and understandings. In the second chapter, I look more closely at the intersections between trauma stories and the life writing of Iranian Jewish women, and I argue that readers use life writing texts about trauma to support an egocentric reconstruction of American democracy and dominance. I also show how a critical frame for understanding trauma can yield interpretations that highlight, rather than ignore, relationships of power and privilege. In the final chapter of the thesis, I present a case study of two online reading groups, and I show that communal reading environments, though they participate in dominant discourses, are also spaces where resistance and subversion can develop.
Description: Thesis (Master, Gender Studies) -- Queen's University, 2011-09-08 22:54:33.728
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/6710
Appears in Collections:Gender Studies Graduate Theses
Queen's Theses & Dissertations

Items in QSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

  DSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2008  The DSpace Foundation - TOP