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dc.contributor.authorMacKay, Robbie J.
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2008-04-10 10:30:48.856en
dc.date.accessioned2008-04-10T17:12:12Z
dc.date.available2008-04-10T17:12:12Z
dc.date.issued2008-04-10T17:12:12Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/1091
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Education) -- Queen's University, 2008-04-10 10:30:48.856en
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the personal and professional experiences of Canadian professional female popular musicians. The researcher gathered data in two phases. In phase one, 85 female musicians completed a 105-question on-line survey. In phase two, the researcher interviewed four musicians to expand and elucidate survey data. In keeping with a critical feminist approach, the researcher’s voice is prominent in the report. The study reveals a complex combination of personal and professional circumstances that both compel and impel women to become musicians, and then to cleave to or to abandon careers in the music industry. Families, peers, role models, and teachers all have some effect on personal and professional choices that musicians make. Gender stereotyping and sexual harassment prevail in both music education and the music industry, making these contested sites for women musicians. However, respondents’ identity as “musician” is a powerful force, in both personal and professional realms, making both education and industry also sites of triumph. Important findings include: respondents’ reflections on what makes for a successful pop musician; data revealed no essential biographical precursors for success in pop music; respondents’ opinions about the importance of music lessons are divided; and, along with credible technical music skills, musicians need to develop strong personal, social, and business skills.en
dc.format.extent1439750 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectMusicen
dc.subjectGender rolesen
dc.subjectPopular musicen
dc.subjectCanadian popular musicen
dc.subjectCanadian womenen
dc.subjectIdentityen
dc.subjectGender stereotypingen
dc.subjectSexual harassmenten
dc.subjectMusic teachersen
dc.subjectProfessional musiciansen
dc.titleThe experiences of Canadian women in popular music: “even on the worst sick no gas freezing Canadian middle of January rockie mountain or Halifax breakdown there is nothing better to do for a living”en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.degreeMasteren
dc.contributor.supervisorLamb, Robertaen
dc.contributor.departmentEducationen


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