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dc.contributor.authorWee, Joy Yenn May
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2007-10-23 15:54:17.836en
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-19T15:06:33Z
dc.date.available2008-06-19T15:06:33Z
dc.date.issued2008-06-19T15:06:33Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/1242
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Rehabilitation Science) -- Queen's University, 2007-10-23 15:54:17.836en
dc.description.abstractPurpose- The World Health Organization describes ‘activities’ as what one does, and ‘participation’ as life situations or roles. This thesis explores and describes important influencers of activities and participation from the perspective of persons with disabilities. It also suggests how to include such information when reporting results of tools measuring activities and participation, so that health professionals working with persons with disabilities might collaborate and communicate more effectively with each other and the people they serve. Method- The World Health Organization framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) was used. Participants with mobility problems living in the community with their disability for a least 1 year were involved in this mixed methods study to gain a broad understanding of how persons with disabilities perceive and experience factors that affect their general and specific activities and participation. Semi-structured interviews guided by categories contained in two standard measures, the Barthel Index (BI), and the Participation Scale (P-scale) were employed, and grounded theory methods were used. From their responses, relationships between important concepts were used to inform a theoretical model. Upon this framework, relevant important shared factors, derived through combining several methods, were incorporated into reporting tools. Results- 24 participants identified 258 individual factors. Grounded theory analysis resulted in The Successful Adaptation Model, describing relationships amongst factors and activities and participation. For the BI, devices, home modifications, and treatments were most contributory. For the P-scale, personality, community and home accessibility, level of impairment, mobility aids, and transportation were among the most influential factors. Conclusion- This study incorporates perspectives of persons with disability into the Successful Adaptation Model, describing factors affecting activities and participation and their interactions. It also suggests a method of reporting important factors in conjunction with standardized measures of activities and participation.en
dc.description.sponsorshipClinical Teachers Association at Queen's University/Southeastern Ontario Academic Medical Association Queen's University Inter-professional Patient-Centred Education Directionen
dc.format.extent1385744 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectActivitiesen
dc.subjectPersons with disabilityen
dc.subjectFactorsen
dc.subjectParticipationen
dc.titleFactors affecting activities and participation in persons with disabilities - informing models and measuresen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.restricted-thesisManuscripts contained within the thesis will be submitted for publicationen
dc.description.degreeMasteren
dc.contributor.supervisorPaterson, Margoen
dc.contributor.supervisorOlney, Sandraen
dc.contributor.departmentRehabilitation Scienceen


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