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dc.contributor.authorMcMillan, Rachel
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2014-09-09 11:32:10.826en
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-15T15:58:48Z
dc.date.available2014-09-15T15:58:48Z
dc.date.issued2014-09-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/12454
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Community Health & Epidemiology) -- Queen's University, 2014-09-09 11:32:10.826en
dc.description.abstractBackground: Canadian youth are increasingly likely to grow up in non-traditional families, such as single parent families, stepfamilies, and/or in the shared physical custody of their separated parents. Given that growing up in a non-traditional family is associated with many negative health outcomes, it is of interest to examine how family structure influences upstream health-related behaviours such as physical activity and sedentary behaviour. Objectives: The objectives of this thesis were to examine family structure as a predictor of organized sports participation and screen time (television-viewing, recreational computer use and video game use). A secondary objective was to assess socioeconomic status as a mediator in the relationship between family structure and organized sports participation. Methods: Data were obtained from a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of Canadian youth in grades 6-10 (N=26 068). Participants’ family structures were classified as traditional, single parent, or reconstituted based on self-report of the number of parents and parents’ partners living in their primary home. Non-traditional families were further classified based on how often the youth reported visiting a second home. Average daily screen time and current organized sports participation were also assessed via self-report. Logistic regression and bootstrap-based mediation analysis were used to examine the associations of interest. Results: Youth from all single parent and reconstituted families had lower odds of sports participation (OR = 0.48 (95% CI: 0.38-0.61) to 0.78 (95% CI: 0.56-1.08)) compared to their traditional family counterparts, regardless of physical custody arrangements. The relationship was moderately-to-weakly mediated by socioeconomic status (ie: <20% change in effect estimate). Youth from single parent and reconstituted iii families did not have higher odds of spending more than 2 hours per day using a television, computer or video game device, or of being in the highest quartile of time spent in these behaviours. Conclusions: Youth living in single parent and reconstituted families experience significant disparities in organized sports participation that are partially mediated by their family’s socioeconomic status. Family structure is not, however, a significant predictor of excessive screen time.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectOrganized sporten_US
dc.subjectSedentary behaviouren_US
dc.subjectFamily structureen_US
dc.subjectScreen timeen_US
dc.subjectCanadianen_US
dc.subjectYouthen_US
dc.titleFamily Structure as a Predictor of Organized Sports Participation and Sedentary Screen Time in Canadian Youthen_US
dc.typethesisen_US
dc.description.degreeMasteren
dc.contributor.supervisorJanssen, Ianen
dc.contributor.supervisorMcIsaac, Michaelen
dc.contributor.departmentCommunity Health and Epidemiologyen


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