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dc.contributor.authorPoitras, Veronica
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2014-09-22 12:29:07.786en
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-23T19:47:32Z
dc.date.available2014-09-23T19:47:32Z
dc.date.issued2014-09-23
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/12486
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D, Kinesiology & Health Studies) -- Queen's University, 2014-09-22 12:29:07.786en
dc.description.abstractIdentifying the contributions to, and consequences of, impaired cardiovascular health and function is critical to inform effective prevention and treatment strategies. Mental stress and a high-fat diet are independent predictors of cardiovascular disease, and impaired vascular endothelial function (assessed via flow-mediated dilation; FMD) may be a common mechanistic link. Exercise can mitigate cardiovascular risk, but cardiovascular dysfunction (i.e. impaired oxygen delivery) can reduce exercise tolerance and decrease adherence. This may be characteristic of persons with Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), but this has never been investigated within the typical constellation of co-morbidities and associated medications in this population. PURPOSE: 1) To evaluate whether the combined experience of mental stress and fat consumption (versus either stimulus alone) exacerbates: postprandial lipemia, stress responsiveness, and endothelial dysfunction. 2) To determine whether T2D (within the typical cluster of co-morbidities and medications) results in impaired exercising muscle oxygen delivery and associated reduced small muscle mass exercise tolerance. METHODS: In healthy persons, FMD was assessed before and hourly for 4-hours post-consumption of a high-fat or low-fat meal, with hourly mental stress (mental arithmetic, speech) or control (counting) tasks. In persons with T2D and matched Controls, forearm critical force (fCFimpulse) was used as an indicator of exercise tolerance; exercising muscle blood flow was measured during fCFimpulse and during the adjustment and steady state of submaximal rest-to-exercise and exercise-to-exercise transitions. Ultrasound was used to measure FMD and exercising muscle blood flow. RESULTS: 1) Repeated mental stress tasks did not impact postprandial lipemia following either meal; 2) Meal fat content did not influence hemodynamic stress responsiveness; 3) Meal fat content did not affect FMD, but endothelial function was modestly greater when the postprandial state was accompanied by mental stress; 4) Relative to matched Controls, representative persons with T2D did not have impaired small muscle mass exercise tolerance (fCFimpulse) or muscle blood flow (rate of adjustment, or amount during submaximal/maximal steady state). CONCLUSIONS: These findings challenge the assertions that mental stress and fat consumption are universally detrimental, and that T2D, on top of the typical constellation of co-morbidities and medications, has an impact on exercising muscle blood flow and exercise tolerance.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjecttype 2 diabetesen_US
dc.subjectflow-mediated dilationen_US
dc.subjectcardiovascular diseaseen_US
dc.subjectfat consumptionen_US
dc.subjectstress reactivityen_US
dc.subjectstress recoveryen_US
dc.subjectmuscle blood flowen_US
dc.subjectoxygen deliveryen_US
dc.subjectcritical poweren_US
dc.subjectmental stressen_US
dc.subjectultrasounden_US
dc.subjectexercise hyperemiaen_US
dc.subjectexercise toleranceen_US
dc.subjectvascular functionen_US
dc.subjectblood flow kineticsen_US
dc.subjectendothelial functionen_US
dc.titleCardiovascular health, disease and function: Contributions of stress and diet, and consequences of type 2 diabetesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.Den
dc.contributor.supervisorTschakovsky, Michael E.en
dc.contributor.supervisorPyke, Kyra E.en
dc.contributor.departmentKinesiology and Health Studiesen


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