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dc.contributor.authorClunies, Gregoryen
dc.date2014-12-18 15:43:45.575
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-19T18:41:04Z
dc.date.issued2014-12-19
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/12663
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Civil Engineering) -- Queen's University, 2014-12-18 15:43:45.575en
dc.description.abstractCoupled hydrodynamic and wave models were used to simulate water levels, currents, waves and salinity transport in the Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine System (APES), a large shallow back-barrier basin in eastern North Carolina, over a one-month long period. Simulations were run for four different bathymetric grids pertaining to distinct time slices during the evolution of the APES corresponding to the present day, and 500, 1000, and 4000 calibrated years before present to determine responses to long-term changes in geomorphology. The present day simulation was used to evaluate a spatially varying wind field developed from the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) dataset in comparison to spatially uniform winds from observations at different sites across the region. Simulations using winds observed offshore result in statistically better hydrodynamic simulations of water levels (R=0.88) in the estuaries than the NARR dataset (R=0.48). The removal of a long shoal from present day bathymetry resulted in a decrease in water level setup by 3% at the estuarine shoreline, a decrease in current magnitude up to 40% and an increase in significant wave height up to 25%, indicating the importance of this shallow feature as a major control on the present day hydrodynamic response of Pamlico Sound. Paleobathymetric grids for three time slices over the late Holocene were developed from sediment core and seismic observations described by Zaremba (2014). Model results were compared to assess the impacts of: 1) varying degrees of barrier island segmentation; 2) long-term changes in basin geomorphology; and 3) sea-level rise on the hydrodynamic response in Pamlico Sound. All three of these influenced the hydrodynamics (e.g., up to 3 times higher tidal range and current velocity) when compared to present day observations and model results. Salinity in the present day simulation was validated using observations, and salinity distributions predicted for each time slice were compared to salinity ranges from foraminiferal assemblages at sediment cores. The results indicate that salinity in Pamlico Sound is strongly influenced by wind and wave-driven mixing and transport, the hydraulic connectivity between Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and the quantity and size of tidal inlets through the barrier island system.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectestuarine processesen
dc.subjectlong-term geomorphic changeen
dc.subjectbarrier segmentationen
dc.subjectPamlico Sounden
dc.subjectprocess-based modelingen
dc.subjectsea-level riseen
dc.titleHydrodynamics of a Large and Shallow Back-Barrier Estuarine System and Responses to Long-Term Changes in Geomorphologyen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.restricted-thesisI intend to publish some of my work in peer-reviewed journals and would not like it to be available before this occurs.en
dc.description.degreeM.A.Sc.en
dc.contributor.supervisorMulligan, Ryan P.en
dc.contributor.departmentCivil Engineeringen
dc.embargo.terms1825en
dc.embargo.liftdate2019-12-18
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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