Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMitri, Mino
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2015-04-29 21:57:36.816en
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-30T19:49:18Z
dc.date.available2015-04-30T19:49:18Z
dc.date.issued2015-04-30
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/13028
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Education) -- Queen's University, 2015-04-29 21:57:36.816en
dc.description.abstractModels of care released over a decade ago advocate for an early and concurrent adoption of disease-modifying and palliative care approaches to address the needs of patients with a life-limiting illness, such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). However, research suggests patients with COPD continue to receive insufficient palliative care. While endorsing these models of care is justified, no study has demonstrated their adoption by physicians caring for patients with COPD. The purpose of this study is to examine the extent to which resident and attending physicians adopt a palliative care approach in patients with COPD. A qualitative design with an exploratory approach was used. Semi-structured interviews conducted over a 5-month period involved 7 residents and 7 attending physicians from internal medicine, respirology, emergency medicine and family medicine. Following verbatim transcription and member checking, the data were inductively analyzed with the aid of the computer software Atlas.ti to identify recurrent themes. Results showed that interviewed physicians unknowingly practice some elements of a palliative care approach with their patients with COPD. Residents repeatedly describe influences from attending physicians’ practices. Physicians’ misperceptions of palliative care and its role in COPD limit their full adoption of this approach, creating disparity on its timely introduction. In conclusion, physicians delay the adoption of palliative care simultaneously with disease-modifying therapies, largely due to three barriers: 1) physicians misperceive palliative care as an approach focused on comfort, 2) physicians fear the negative perceptions held by patients about palliative care; and 3) physicians use a reactive approach to palliative care rather than a proactive approach. However, they hold a propensity to concurrently adopt a palliative care approach with disease-modifying therapies, albeit delayed, suggesting a shift in medical culture. Residency education about the role of palliative care in the management of patients with COPD is lacking. This should be complemented by providing targeted education for attending physicians to meet the needs of patients with COPD.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsCreative Commons - Attribution - CC BYen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectPalliative Careen_US
dc.subjectPhysiciansen_US
dc.subjectChronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseaseen_US
dc.titlePerceptions of Physicians on the Adoption of a Palliative Care Approach in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseaseen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeMasteren
dc.contributor.supervisorKlinger, Don A.en
dc.contributor.departmentEducationen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record