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dc.contributor.authorAcara, Eda
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2015-06-02 22:48:40.429en
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-03T17:05:47Z
dc.date.available2015-08-02T08:00:21Z
dc.date.issued2015-06-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/13113
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D, Geography) -- Queen's University, 2015-06-02 22:48:40.429en
dc.description.abstractThis thesis addresses the tension between industrial development policies and environmental protection and the rising pollution levels in the City of Lüleburgaz in Thrace region, a peripheral region of Istanbul, Turkey. The environmental narratives of second- third-generation Muslim-Balkan immigrants, who began arriving in the early 20th Century, and Kurdish migrants, who arrived in Lüleburgaz in the post-1990 era, express conflict geographies of pollution across communities and between the communities and the state. Heavy pollution in the Ergene River, where the river is declared “dead,” is not a mere accident but rather a facet of neoliberal environmental governance. A politics of non-governance Conflicting narratives of Muslim-Balkan immigrants and Kurdish migrants uncover multiple layered conflict geographies of water pollution in Thrace region by grappling with the question of how “the nation” is continously reterritorialized within neoliberalized constructions of environment and river politics at the community and policy realms. Ethnic-class segregation leads to different community demands with regard to river pollution and environmental degradation in neighbourhoods characterized by different materialities of housing and occupation, a particular facet of non-governance that creates landscapes of invisibility. This analysis contributes to theories on “actually existing neoliberalism” and the ways through which the nation and its various territorial practices at different epochs of neoliberalization processes not only create consent for neoliberalization practices, but also give way for historical and racialized ethnic conflicts to survive.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectRiver pollutionen_US
dc.subjectTerritorialization of Ethnic Conflictsen_US
dc.subjectNationalismen_US
dc.subjectThrace Region of Turkeyen_US
dc.subjectErgene Riveren_US
dc.subjectConflict Geographiesen_US
dc.subjectLuleburgazen_US
dc.subjectNeoliberalizationen_US
dc.titleCONFLICT GEOGRAPHIES OF WATER POLLUTION IN THRACE REGION OF TURKEYen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.restricted-thesisI am still in the middle of drafting publications, so I want this thesis to be restricted until the publications come out.en
dc.description.degreePh.Den
dc.contributor.supervisorKobayashi, Audreyen
dc.contributor.departmentGeographyen
dc.embargo.terms1825en


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