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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Andrewen
dc.date2015-08-14 08:44:45.15
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-18T23:57:03Z
dc.date.available2015-08-18T23:57:03Z
dc.date.issued2015-08-18
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/13506
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D, Psychology) -- Queen's University, 2015-08-14 08:44:45.15en
dc.description.abstractIn this program of research I examined the influence of multiple-showup procedures on the reliability of eyewitness identification. If an eyewitness rejects a suspect from a showup, law enforcement personnel may search for new suspects, and if a new suspect is found, they may run another showup with the same eyewitness. Law enforcement personnel may go through several iterations of finding suspects and running showups with the same eyewitness for single-perpetrator crimes (Chapter 3, Study 1). The use of multiple-showup procedures with the same eyewitness increased innocence risk (Clark & Godfrey, 2009), the probability that a suspect was innocent given identification (Chapter 3, Studies 2 and 3). The increase in innocence risk was primarily attributable to the fact that innocent suspect identifications cumulate when law enforcement personnel use multiple showups in single-perpetrator crimes. Although pre-showup instructions decreased innocent suspect identifications, innocence risk remained unacceptably high (Chapter 3, Study 4; Chapter 4). On a more positive note, pre-showup instructions intended to reduce eyewitness’ perceptions of scarcity (belief that they may not have another opportunity to identify the perpetrator) decreased innocent suspect identifications over and above a may-or-may-not be present admonition (Chapter 4). Scarcity instructions may prove useful in identification procedures, more broadly. I argue that an identification from a multiple-showup procedure is not reasonable evidence of guilt; however, practical constraints may require that law enforcement personnel sometimes show eyewitnesses more than a single showup. A stronger partition between investigative and evidentiary procedures is recommended (Chapter 5).en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectEyewitnessen
dc.subjectInnocence Risken
dc.subjectScarcityen
dc.subjectShowupen
dc.titleAssessing the Reliability of Multiple-Showup Procedures With a Single Eyewitnessen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreePhDen
dc.contributor.supervisorLindsay, Roderick C. L.en
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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