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dc.contributor.authorPlant, Johannaen
dc.date2015-08-19 12:56:41.767
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T00:24:47Z
dc.date.available2015-08-21T00:24:47Z
dc.date.issued2015-08-20
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/13512
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D, Art History) -- Queen's University, 2015-08-19 12:56:41.767en
dc.description.abstractThis study investigates the production of knowledge through the archives of artist-run centres in Canada in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Archival scholars recognize that the ways materials are collected, presented, and controlled in an archive can impact the types of narratives that may be created from them. But how do such operations occur in artist-run centres, and what challenges might they pose to the construction of historical narratives? What can the ways in which centres define, organize, and provide access to their archival materials reveal about artist-run culture? More specifically, how do systems of ordering, acts of donation, archival architecture, and virtual archives of artist-run centres affect the potential use of these materials in future histories? This contemporary art history thesis borrows literature and questions from cultural studies and archival science. I explore the multiple and fluid forms of archives claimed by each of these overlapping disciplines, and by artist-run centres themselves. To generate new information about artist-run centre archives, I employ a sociological-ethnographical approach, undertaking a broad survey of arts-related self-organized entities, and conducting interviews with selected representatives of artist-run centres. The assumption that informs these methods of investigation is that information about artistic, archival, and administrative practices can best be gathered from the practitioners themselves. Such an approach respects the knowledge and autonomy of the individual and organizational participants, and is in line with a general artist-run ethos, which calls for the recognition of the experience and expertise of artists and cultural producers.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsCreative Commons - Attribution - CC BYen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectCanadaen
dc.subjectCommunity Archivingen
dc.subjectArtist-Run Archivesen
dc.subjectArtist-Run Centresen
dc.subjectCultural Democracyen
dc.subjectArtist-Run Cultureen
dc.subjectHistoriographyen
dc.subjectArchivesen
dc.titleConstituting the Archives of Artist-Run Culture: A Self-Conscious Apparatus of Historyen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreePhDen
dc.contributor.supervisorRobertson, Cliveen
dc.contributor.departmentArt Historyen
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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