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dc.contributor.authorGraham, Ryan Bevan
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2008-08-18 15:55:16.757en
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-20T18:23:58Z
dc.date.available2008-08-20T18:23:58Z
dc.date.issued2008-08-20T18:23:58Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/1357
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Kinesiology & Health Studies) -- Queen's University, 2008-08-18 15:55:16.757en
dc.description.abstractThe purposes of the present work were: 1) to develop a computerized model that could predict the personal lift-assist device (PLAD) spring excursion and control spring stiffness for various individuals based on their anthropometry and working posture and 2) to test the PLAD’s (Version 6) effectiveness and user acceptability during static forward bending in an automotive assembly plant. Study 1 required 30 subjects to carry out a protocol that simulated unloaded stoop, squat, and freestyle lifting. Trunk inclination and knee angles were determined via 3 FastrakTM sensors, whereas a displacement transducer attached in-line with the PLAD determined excursion when the trunk or knees flexed. A model was created to determine spring excursion, and it was successfully validated with 10 additional subjects. A computerized model applying the excursion model and mathematical equations was also developed to calculate the required spring stiffness for offsetting a proportion of the L4/L5 bending moment for each individual in various postures. Study 2 investigated the effectiveness and user acceptability of the PLAD at an automotive manufacturing facility, using operators who performed an assembly process requiring forward bending and static holds. Surface EMG data were collected at six sites on the low back and abdomen, and a tri-axial accelerometer was mounted on each subject’s sternum to measure trunk inclination. A 20% reduction in the L4/L5 bending moment was provided to each wearer using the aforementioned computerized model. The PLAD was able to significantly reduce low back muscular activity, predicted-compression, and ratings of perceived exertion, without significantly changing abdominal activity or trunk inclination. Workers had positive opinions about the device, and 80% said they would wear the device everyday on-line. Additionally, the computerized model developed in Study 1 was effective, as worker low back muscular activity was reduced by approximately 20% when wearing the PLAD. With slight alterations, the PLAD appears to be beneficial in reducing low back forces and discomfort in many tasks that place excessive biomechanical loading on the low back.en
dc.format.extent4859200 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectErgonomic aiden
dc.subjectElectromyographyen
dc.subjectManual materials handlingen
dc.titleEffectiveness of an on-body lifting aid at reducing low-back physical demands during an automotive assembly task : assessment of EMG response and user acceptabilityen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeMasteren
dc.contributor.supervisorStevenson, Joan M.en
dc.contributor.departmentKinesiology and Health Studiesen


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