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dc.contributor.authorvan Tol, Deanne Gabrielleen
dc.date2015-08-26 21:13:24.922
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-09T23:31:47Z
dc.date.issued2015-09-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/13581
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D, History) -- Queen's University, 2015-08-26 21:13:24.922en
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the rhetoric and practice of voluntary welfare work by British women within the twentieth-century British Empire. Voluntarism was an important component of the attention to colonial welfare and development that was a dominant theme of the ideology and practice of the last decades of the British Empire. Debated and defined during the 1930s, programs to enact welfare and development were implemented after the Second World War as part of a revived empire during the 1950s. These programs remained integral to post-colonial relationships after the rapid dismantling of empire in the 1960s. Examining the welfare component of twentieth-century imperial aspirations, this study follows the informal practitioners of colonial welfare—the British women residing in empire who through voluntary work contributed to both defining and delivering colonial welfare—considering the intersection of individual lives and imperial responsibilities. This study offers a comparative and trans-imperial account of individual women engaged in voluntary efforts alongside a closer analysis of the rhetoric and reality of voluntarism in colonial Kenya. White women residing in the colonies contributed voluntarily to the provision of colonial health, education, and social services after the First World War: their efforts were both part of everyday life and entwined in the imperial politics of welfare, gender, and race. The phenomenon of imperial voluntarism represented continuity in the ideas and activities of white women on the colonial frontier, yet imperial voluntarism also represented change within the context of the particular conditions of twentieth-century empire. Chapters engage with themes of voluntary work and daily life, the politics of voluntary work, the relevance of voluntarism within an emerging post-war colonial welfare state, and the entanglement of imperial volunteers within the violence and political processes of decolonization.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsCreative Commons - Attribution - CC BYen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectvoluntarismen
dc.subjectgenderen
dc.subjectsocial welfareen
dc.subjectimperial historyen
dc.titleImperial Volunteering: Women and Welfare in the Twentieth-Century British Empireen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.restricted-thesisTo restrict rights to enable commercial publication.en
dc.description.degreePhDen
dc.contributor.supervisorden Otter, Sandra M.en
dc.contributor.supervisorShenton, Robert W.en
dc.contributor.departmentHistoryen
dc.embargo.terms1825en
dc.embargo.liftdate2020-09-07
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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