Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHung, Eleanor
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2015-09-03 23:23:20.275en
dc.date2015-09-12 15:54:16.321en
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-12T23:14:22Z
dc.date.available2015-09-12T23:14:22Z
dc.date.issued2015-09-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/13594
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Community Health & Epidemiology) -- Queen's University, 2015-09-12 15:54:16.321en
dc.description.abstractBackground: Shift work is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). This thesis focuses on the potential disruption of cortisol production by shift work, a proposed underlying pathway to CVD. Objectives: (1) To describe the diurnal quantity and pattern of cortisol production according to shift work status (exclusive-day, or rotating days and nights), and according to parameters of rotating shift work (timing, length, and intensity). (2) To determine how current shift work status and past shift work affects diurnal quantity and pattern of cortisol production. (3) To determine the effects of rotating shift work parameters on diurnal pattern and quantity of cortisol production. Methods: 328 female hospital employees (160 day workers, 168 rotating shift workers) participated in a cross-sectional study consisting of: (1) an initial interview and anthropometric assessment, (2) completion of a questionnaire package to ascertain work characteristics, and (3) collection of urine over a 48-hour period to measure creatinine-adjusted cortisol. Cortisol profiles and unadjusted summary measures were used to describe the quantity and pattern of diurnal cortisol production by shift work status and parameters of rotating shift work exposure. The effect of shift work on diurnal cortisol was determined using multivariable linear regression modeling. Results: Compared to day workers, rotating shift workers had flatter diurnal cortisol curves and produced less cortisol during their night shift cycle. However, during day shift cycles, there was no difference between shift workers and day workers in the quantity produced. Each additional year of shift work exposure was associated with an increase in diurnal cortisol production in day workers only. Conclusions: Night work is associated with acutely attenuated cortisol production, while a greater number of years of past shift work increased cortisol production. Thus, cortisol disruption may be a potential mechanism linking shift work to CVD development.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsCreative Commons - Attribution - CC BYen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseasesen_US
dc.subjectFemale Hospital Employeesen_US
dc.subjectShift Work Parametersen_US
dc.subjectCortisolen_US
dc.subjectCVDen_US
dc.subjectShift Worken_US
dc.titleShift Work and Cortisol Production Among Female Hospital Employeesen_US
dc.typethesisen_US
dc.description.degreeMasteren
dc.contributor.supervisorTranmer, Joan E.en
dc.contributor.supervisorAronson, Kristan J.en
dc.contributor.departmentCommunity Health and Epidemiologyen
dc.embargo.liftdate2020-11-10


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record