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dc.contributor.authorSoncin, Stephen
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2015-09-08 17:18:53.324en
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-15T18:59:03Z
dc.date.available2015-09-20T08:00:11Z
dc.date.issued2015-09-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/13605
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Neuroscience Studies) -- Queen's University, 2015-09-08 17:18:53.324en
dc.description.abstractAttention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and bipolar disorder (BD) are prevalent in the population, highly comorbid, and have similar clinical features that complicate diagnoses despite rather distinct diagnostic criteria. Executive functioning deficits in ADHD are similar to those reported in BD but lack the specificity to distinguish between these groups. Emotion processing similarly affects both ADHD and BD and, by combining these processes on a single task, we may increase sensitivity to differences between these populations in a way that may better categorize each disorder. Therefore, we compared performance on a cognitively demanding, affective oculomotor task. Adults, aged 18-62, with ADHD (n=22), BD (n=20), and healthy Controls (n=21) performed an interleaved pro- and antisaccade task (look toward versus looking away from a visual target, respectively). Task irrelevant emotional faces (fear, happy, sad, neutral) were presented on a subset of trials either before or with the target. We observed a group by task interaction (F(2,58)=3.849,p=.027,ηp2=.117) where the ADHD group made more direction errors (looked in the wrong direction) than Controls in the antisaccade condition (p=.027). A three way interaction between image, task, and group (Fig.6; F(8, 58)=2.607,p=.013,ηp2=.082) revealed that presentation of negatively valenced, fear (p=.044) and sad (p=.053), and ambiguous, neutral (p=.003), emotional faces increased saccadic reaction time in BD. In summary, the antisaccade task in general differentiated ADHD from Controls and simultaneous emotion processing further impaired processing speed in BD only. These findings suggest that response inhibition-emotion processing interactions differ between BD and ADHD and reinforce that emotion processing deficits are fundamental in BD and may be attention-driven in ADHD. We propose that response inhibition is critical in both processing systems, but this inhibitory signal is selectively slowed down by concurrent emotion processing dysfunction in BD. We refer to a hypothetical framework integrating these systems and suggest potential loci of dysfunction, the amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex, that may result in the emotional modulation of oculomotor behaviour we have observed here. The differences in how these processing systems interact in ADHD and BD may better characterize each disorder and suggests that refinement of an emotional antisaccade task may be clinically useful.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsCreative Commons - Attribution - CC BYen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectEye Movementsen_US
dc.subjectExecutive Functionen_US
dc.subjectAntisaccadeen_US
dc.subjectSocial Cognitionen_US
dc.titleContrasting Emotion Processing and Response Inhibition Deficits in ADHD and Bipolar Disorderen_US
dc.typethesisen_US
dc.description.restricted-thesisCertain journals are particularly strict with regard to publishing materials that may appear published elsewhere. I intended to submit my second chapter for publication and would rather avoid this issue.en
dc.description.degreeMasteren
dc.contributor.supervisorMarin, Alinaen
dc.contributor.supervisorMunoz, Douglas P.en
dc.contributor.departmentNeuroscience Studiesen
dc.embargo.terms1825en


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