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dc.contributor.authorQuaile, Sheilagh
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2015-09-09 10:54:33.486en
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-16T20:38:13Z
dc.date.issued2015-09-16
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/13618
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Art History) -- Queen's University, 2015-09-09 10:54:33.486en
dc.description.abstractWoven shawls from the Kashmir region of the Indian subcontinent became a popular fashion in Europe during the latter half of the eighteenth century and throughout the nineteenth. European manufacturers soon picked up on this trend, producing textiles which imitated eastern designs but sold at competitively lower prices from the 1780s onwards. As a consequence of their fashionability, Kashmiri shawls and their imitations made frequent appearances within European paintings. To date, there has been an absence of art historical investigation into the visual representation of Kashmiri shawls and their imitations within nineteenth-century painting, though several scholars have examined their appearance within French and English literature. This paper seeks to fill a literary gap by investigating Kashmiri shawls and their imitations depicted in British paintings from 1850 to 1910, with several French paintings included to support the analysis. Paintings are an appropriate source for considering the materiality of the shawl as they are some of the only available visual evidence to how shawls were worn and consumed as textiles (and to who wore and consumed them). Each of the three paintings selected for the three main chapters of this thesis serves as a case study. These are Hunt’s The Awakening Conscience (1853-1854) and The Children’s Holiday (1864-1865), and Francis Henry Newbery’s The Paisley Shawl (c. 1910). These examples have been selected for the visual centrality of the shawls within each painting, for their differing temporality (dated to the mid-1850s, mid-1860s, and c.1910, respectively) and settings (a London villa interior, English country park, and a Scottish cottage interior, respectively), and for the shawls’ dissimilar materiality and appearance. The women depicted are also of varying ages and social classes, representing diverse consumers of the shawls at separate moments of its history. Through a material culture-based analysis of the shawls, which combines close-reading of the depicted shawls as objects with consultation of ‘external’ historical sources, this thesis utilizes painted images as texts to interpret nuanced contemporary cultural and social information that was attached to the shawl during the long nineteenth century in Britain.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectShawlsen_US
dc.subjectPaintingsen_US
dc.subjectBritainen_US
dc.subjectWilliam Holman Hunten_US
dc.subjectFrancis Henry Newberyen_US
dc.subjectMaterial Cultureen_US
dc.subjectWomen's Fashionen_US
dc.subjectPaisleyen_US
dc.subjectNineteenth Centuryen_US
dc.subjectSocial Classen_US
dc.subjectSocial Historyen_US
dc.subjectVictorian Eraen_US
dc.subjectCultural Historyen_US
dc.subjectIndiaen_US
dc.subjectTextilesen_US
dc.subjectClothingen_US
dc.subjectExoticismen_US
dc.subjectKashmiren_US
dc.subjectLong Nineteenth Centuryen_US
dc.subjectFashionen_US
dc.subjectPortraitureen_US
dc.titleWrapped in import: Kashmiri shawls in British paintings of the long nineteenth centuryen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.restricted-thesisI intend to publish material from this thesis as an article, and, additionally, as a conference presentation in the near future.en
dc.description.degreeMasteren
dc.contributor.supervisorHelland, Janiceen
dc.contributor.departmentArt Historyen
dc.embargo.terms1825en
dc.embargo.liftdate2020-09-14


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