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dc.contributor.authorNaveed, Filzaen
dc.date2015-09-17 13:44:36.306
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-17T22:28:01Z
dc.date.issued2015-09-17
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/13624
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Cultural Studies) -- Queen's University, 2015-09-17 13:44:36.306en
dc.description.abstractPakistanis in Hollywood films and U.S. television shows have largely been depicted as a threat to the western world. Television shows such as Homeland and Numbers, and films like G.I Joe and Zero Dark Thirty, have depicted Pakistani characters as terrorists and as one-dimensional characters, lacking depth. Their screen portrayal has been particularly negative after 9/11/01. Given that most Pakistanis identify themselves as Muslims, Pakistanis in the U.S. have been automatically subjected to racial profiling and surveillance by the U.S. state apparatus following the September 11 attacks. As a Pakistani studying in North America, I decided to focus my MA research on exploring this fractured identity in the post 9/11/01 landscape. I chose to do this through films as they inform people’s interpretations of the world, of themselves, and of others. This thesis will review non-Western films, which I argue, offer a counter narrative to mainstream Hollywood’s treatment of Pakistanis. I will be examining two international co-productions, Khuda Ke Liye (2007; Pakistan and USA) and The Reluctant Fundamentalist (2012; USA, UK and Qatar). Both films depict the experience of the Pakistani “Other” in the U.S., immediately following the 9/11/01 attacks. This paper will review the ideological messages of both films, and analyze how the films portray their Pakistani protagonists. Through examining these non-Western films, I will show that such cinematic works can offer a global resistance, and a global solidarity, against the “us versus them” narrative prevailing in American entertainment. I thus investigate how these international co-productions viewed the 9/11 attacks while also considering the impact it generated on the lives of Pakistani Muslims living in the West.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectPakistanen
dc.subjectTerrorismen
dc.subjectMira Nairen
dc.subjectmedia analysisen
dc.subjectOccidentalismen
dc.subjectOrientalismen
dc.subjectMedia Studiesen
dc.subjectFilm and Mediaen
dc.subjectKhuda Ke Liyeen
dc.subjectThe Reluctant Fundamentalisten
dc.titleExamining Pakistani Identities in Non-Western Cinema in the Post 9/11 Landscapeen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.restricted-thesisI might decide to publish parts of this thesis in a journal and would like my research to remain hidden until such time.en
dc.description.degreeM.A.en
dc.contributor.supervisorNaaman, Doriten
dc.contributor.departmentCultural Studiesen
dc.embargo.terms1825en
dc.embargo.liftdate2020-09-15
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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