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dc.contributor.authorJansen, Dinah
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2015-09-28 13:50:24.171en
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-01T22:45:44Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/13711
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D, History) -- Queen's University, 2015-09-28 13:50:24.171en
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is an examination of Russian liberal thought, its durability, and its tensions in exile in interwar France. Through analysis of archival documents and contemporary pamphlets, memoranda, and print media, this thesis adds new dimensions to the scholarship on Russia Abroad, Russian liberalism, and exile politics. Russian liberal groups and actors held and established particular myths about their ideal homeland and harnessed critical occasions to elaborate their evolving ideology regarding the health, strength, and ‘greatness’ of the Russian state while addressing threats they perceived for their realization parallel to the existence of Soviet regime at home. After October: Russian Liberalism as a ‘Work in Progress,’ 1919-1945 unpacks the lively political history of this stateless exile community as it sought ways to connect to the homeland and work for the improvement of the state and its people in spite of their spatial and political alienation. Throughout, this thesis emphasizes key concerns for Russian liberals including the territorial unity and security of the state, its level of modernity and civilization vis-à-vis the West, the need to build a liberal democratic federal republic after Bolshevism, and the creation of a free, educated, loyal, and active citizenry capable of contributing to the socio-political commonweal. Numerous tensions emerged in liberal thought and approach, indicating that their liberal visions of the state were very much still a work in progress. Their continued efforts to elaborate on their values in response to developing circumstances at home and abroad show how Russian liberals created and maintained for themselves a sense of purpose and identity throughout the interwar period.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectFamine of 1921-1922en_US
dc.subjectMonarchismen_US
dc.subjectRussiaen_US
dc.subjectEurasianismen_US
dc.subjectWorld War IIen_US
dc.subjectRussian Exilesen_US
dc.subjectAnglo-Soviet Trade Agreementen_US
dc.subjectPavel Miliukoven_US
dc.subjectParis Peace Conferenceen_US
dc.subjectPoslednie novostien_US
dc.subjectVasilii Maklakoven_US
dc.subjectLiberalismen_US
dc.titleAfter October: Russian Liberalism as a 'Work in Progress,' 1919-1945en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.restricted-thesisNegotiating a book contract at the moment.en
dc.description.degreePh.Den
dc.contributor.supervisorManley, Rebeccaen
dc.contributor.supervisorSiljak, Anaen
dc.contributor.departmentHistoryen
dc.embargo.terms1825en
dc.embargo.liftdate2020-09-29


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