Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMeneley, Barbara
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2015-09-28 19:31:23.959en
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-03T22:46:52Z
dc.date.available2015-10-03T22:46:52Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/13751
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D, Cultural Studies) -- Queen's University, 2015-09-28 19:31:23.959en
dc.description.abstractMy doctoral project is a study of how art was used in the promotion and dissemination of colonial ideologies and in the recruitment of settlers to Canada in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries, specifically under the aegis of Clifford Sifton as Canada's Minister of the Interior from 1896 to 1905. My project interrogates the content and dissemination of immigration advertising, establishes its role in the cultural production of settler and national imaginaries, and appropriates its tactics to build creative strategies of decolonization in contemporary sites. To this end, my project operates in two, interrelated ways: first, by establishing the colonialist agenda of immigration advertising through an integrated interrogation of primary sources using critical visual and theoretical analysis, and second, by appropriating and subverting Sifton's tactics of visual communication to create a series of artworks that critically reactivate and reframe this material in such a way that its ideological thrust and colonialist underpinnings are made apparent. My project develops through creative practice in four ways. It examines the potential for creative practice to disrupt the ongoing cultural performance of settler colonialism, to open the reproductive practices of settler colonialism to critical reflection, to recruit participation in decolonization, and to actively operate in creating strategies of reimagining and restorying. I develop this work through practice-based research methodology, self-reflexively, from my perspective as a settler, settler descendant, and treaty person, focusing on a settler audience to contribute to anticolonial dialogues and conciliation in contemporary sites.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectpractice-based researchen_US
dc.subjectanticolonialismen_US
dc.subjectcolonial immigration advertisingen_US
dc.titleUnsettling the Last Best West: Restorying Settler Imaginariesen_US
dc.typethesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.Den
dc.contributor.supervisorJessup, Lyndaen
dc.contributor.departmentCultural Studiesen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record