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dc.contributor.authorYu, Jieen
dc.date2015-10-01 23:38:39.256
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-04T01:33:43Z
dc.date.available2015-10-04T01:33:43Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/13768
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D, Geography) -- Queen's University, 2015-10-01 23:38:39.256en
dc.description.abstractThe population is aging rapidly in China as a result of the baby boom, the One-Child Policy and a declining mortality rate in the past decades. The government has proposed “Aging at home” and “Societalization of elder care” as the basic strategies for the older population. Beijing is a typical case to study for emerging social programs and services as the capital city. In the human geography literature, experiences of aging and care at home and at the community level have been barely studied in a Chinese context. Methodologically, a “new division” is taking place between quantitative and qualitative researchers in health geography. (Rosenberg, 2015) This dissertation seeks to contribute to the current literature by providing a non-Western lens and combining quantitative and qualitative methods in understanding old age, place and care. There are two broad research objectives in the dissertation: first, to understand the experiences of aging in place and older people’s negotiations with changing environments in old age; and second, to understand access to home and community-based services and the experience of care. The above research goals are achieved by using both quantitative and qualitative methods. Four hundreds and fifty-one valid questionnaires were collected for quantitative analysis. Forty-seven older people and 21 caregivers were interviewed for qualitative analysis. It is found that the current physical, built and social environments inform the meanings of place and challenge the identities older people that have been established throughout the life course. The representation of the socialist past among older people is circumscribed by their economic conditions and environmental situation. Home and community-based care is largely provided by informal caregivers while their roles are decreasing. Access to care is varied by individual socioeconomic characteristics and place. The public sector’s role in providing care is still small and conflicts are common between older care recipients and private sector providers. By adopting mixed methods, they complement each other to provide a more complete story and bring different foci to the fore in understanding the issues. The dissertation sheds light on the government’s planning and policy making in China.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectCareen
dc.subjectPlaceen
dc.subjectAgingen
dc.titleOld Age, Place and Care: the Experiences of Aging in Place in Bejing, Chinaen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreePhDen
dc.contributor.supervisorRosenberg, Mark W.en
dc.contributor.departmentGeographyen
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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