Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCole, Adamen
dc.date2015-10-01 13:53:48.84
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-06T21:48:15Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/13783
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D, History) -- Queen's University, 2015-10-01 13:53:48.84en
dc.description.abstractIn 1968, Ontario’s Department of Education released a report entitled Living and Learning: The Report of the Provincial Committee on Aims and Objectives of Education in the Schools of Ontario, which quickly came to be called the “Hall-Dennis Report” or simply “Hall-Dennis” after the names of its chairmen, Emmett Hall and Lloyd Dennis. The Report urged Ontarians to accept a new vision of education, one in which students were no longer organized in classes, their progress no longer measured by grades, and their experience no longer characterized by the painful acquisition of subjects but rather by a joyous and open-ended process of learning. The Report marked a significant moment not only in the development of Ontario’s educational system but in Canadian cultural history. In its outline of a new, “democratic” system of education for Ontario, one that it associated with the highest ideals of progress, liberalism, and humanism, Hall-Dennis revealed not only the high ambitions of liberal utopianism in the 1960s, but also suggested the extent to which its proponents sought to tame the forces of radicalism and maintain the pre-existing socio-economic order, albeit under the daunting and increasingly fragmenting circumstances of high modernity.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsCreative Commons - Attribution - CC BYen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectOntario Historyen
dc.subjectModernityen
dc.subjectEducational Historyen
dc.subjectUtopianismen
dc.subjectEducation Reformen
dc.subjectCanadian Historyen
dc.subjectPostwar Historyen
dc.subjectCultural Historyen
dc.titleChildren, Liberalism and Utopia: Education, Hall-Dennis and Modernity in Ontario’s Long 1960sen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.restricted-thesisFor commercial reasons -- i.e. for publication.en
dc.description.degreePhDen
dc.contributor.supervisorMcKay, Ian G.en
dc.contributor.departmentHistoryen
dc.embargo.terms1825en
dc.embargo.liftdate2020-10-04
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record