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dc.contributor.authorStirrett, Natasha
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2015-12-21 15:40:32.189en
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-23T18:54:59Z
dc.date.available2015-12-23T18:54:59Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-23
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/13904
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Gender Studies) -- Queen's University, 2015-12-21 15:40:32.189en
dc.description.abstractDuring the Sixties Scoop, there was a mass apprehension of indigenous children from their families and communities during the 1960’s and 1980’s within Canada. This unprecedented disruption to the fabric of indigenous communities still resonates in the contemporary over- representation of indigenous children within the settler colonial child welfare system. In the field of indigenous studies, there is little research documenting this history and in this thesis I sought to contribute to this existing literature. Drawing upon indigenous and black feminist theories and Foucaudian genealogy I analyze archival materials, memoir and creative texts that explain the Sixties Scoop as part of an ongoing displacement of indigenous peoples. This thesis explores the underlying racist and colonial logics to question the legitimacy of the child welfare system. Coupling this frame, I sought to highlight the significance of relationality and kinship bonds among indigenous and non-indigenous people. The thesis positions the creative writings of Beatrice Mosionier’s novel In Search of April Raintree (1983) and her memoir Come Walk with Me (2009) and my autoethnographic story as narratives that work across as well as outside a colonial frame. Within entangled threads of colonial histories, and through indigenous storytelling we can witness the narrative threads of indigenous peoples surviving displacement and familial separations and practicing cultural continuity. Storytelling allows us to build our communities and envision renewed ways to relate to each other.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsCreative Commons - Attribution - CC BYen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectSixties Scoopen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous Storytellingen_US
dc.subjectChild Welfareen_US
dc.titleREVISITING THE SIXTIES SCOOP: RELATIONALITY, KINSHIP AND HONOURING INDIGENOUS STORIESen_US
dc.typethesisen_US
dc.description.degreeMasteren
dc.contributor.supervisorMorgensen, Scott Lauriaen
dc.contributor.departmentGender Studiesen


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