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dc.contributor.authorClancy, Graemeen
dc.date2016-01-25 13:33:43.496
dc.date2016-01-25 17:34:09.465
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-27T21:56:27Z
dc.date.available2016-02-07T09:00:13Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-27
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/13982
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Chemical Engineering) -- Queen's University, 2016-01-25 17:34:09.465en
dc.description.abstractA method to fabricate solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) anodes in a controlled process has been developed. Adjustment of deposition rate was found to alter the anode porosity and particle size distribution. A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) testing system was enhanced to complete steam electrolysis testing of the cells with prepared anodes. To prepare anodes of desirable morphology and uniform thickness the effect of spraying parameters on anode morphology were studied. Sonication of the anode inks was found to reduce particle agglomerations in the ink dispersion. A technique for obtaining and analyzing SEM cross sections of SOECs was developed to study prepared anodes. Investigation of sprayed anodes revealed that the porosity decreased as the deposition rate was increased. Using ImageJ analysis software particle size distributions of prepared anodes were determined. Anodes deposited at higher deposition rates were seen to have larger particle sizes. A greater anode deposition rate increased the likelihood of particle settling and agglomeration, leading to the decreased porosity and increased particle size in the anodes. A membrane humidifier was developed and tested to steadily supply steam to the electrolysis cell, the first such humidifier combined with a ProbotStatTM testing rig. Using the modified testing system, a testing method for SOEC analysis was developed. The process for producing polarization curves was studied to determine the desired testing conditions. During testing hysteresis between increasing and decreasing polarization curves, and anode conditioning during constant current electrolysis were seen for some cells. The appearance or absence of both phenomena were seen to be connected.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectPorous Materialsen
dc.subjectElectrochemistryen
dc.subjectSolid Oxide Electrolysis Cell Anodesen
dc.subjectHydrogenen
dc.titleModification of a High-Temperature Electrochemical Testing Station and Experimental Development for Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cell Anode Analysisen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.restricted-thesisSections of this work are in the process of being submitted as a commercial publication.en
dc.description.degreeM.A.Sc.en
dc.contributor.supervisorPeppley, Brant A.en
dc.contributor.departmentChemical Engineeringen
dc.embargo.terms1825en
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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