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dc.contributor.authorThibault, Katie
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2016-04-10 18:15:55.725en
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-11T15:50:19Z
dc.date.available2016-04-11T15:50:19Z
dc.date.issued2016-04-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/14203
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Gender Studies) -- Queen's University, 2016-04-10 18:15:55.725en
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the over-representation of indigenous women in Canadian federal prisons. I situate the prison as a site of modernity to draw attention to the ways that the prison is underpinned by the logics of white supremacy. I posit that the prison is a complicated geography wherein the differential and overlapping colonial histories of slavery and indigenous genocide are intricately linked and also bifurcated. The prison enables racial violence and at the same time, erases this violence against indigenous women from public purview. This is to say, that the prison upholds the project of modernity through the sequestering and dispossession of indigenous communities, and this spatial act must be considered alongside other geographies of removal, such as the plantation and the reserve. Colonial carceral logics also operate beyond the space of the prison, which leads me to consider the staggering numbers of murdered and missing indigenous women as part of the colonial project that is deeply invested in the maintenance of white supremacy. In addition to reviewing key theories in black and indigenous prison studies, I discuss reports released from the Correctional Investigator’s Office to clarify how reportage narratives of “change” are unable to rectify the disproportionate rates of federally incarcerated indigenous women. I also explore maps of Canadian prisons to think through how colonial and carceral geographies conceal racial violence. Throughout this project, I centralize that within colonial spaces there are always decolonial narratives. I posit that prison abolition must be accompanied by decolonial projects invested in dismantling the logics of white supremacy. Specifically, turning to creative texts, such as storytelling, illuminates how practices of human relationality are subversive acts wherein articulations of a better future emerge.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsCreative Commons - Attribution - CC BYen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectIndigenous Studies, Black Studies, Feminist Studies, Prison and Carceral Studiesen_US
dc.titleThe Canadian Carceral State: Violent Colonial Logics of Indigenous Dispossessionen_US
dc.typethesisen_US
dc.description.degreeMasteren
dc.contributor.supervisorMcKittrick, Katherineen
dc.contributor.departmentGender Studiesen


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