Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorOlesovsky, Shelby
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2016-05-29 06:45:30.486en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-30T15:31:02Z
dc.date.available2016-05-30T15:31:02Z
dc.date.issued2016-05-30
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/14459
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Neuroscience Studies) -- Queen's University, 2016-05-29 06:45:30.486en
dc.description.abstractStroke is a prevalent disorder with immense socioeconomic impact. A variety of chronic neurological deficits result from stroke. In particular, sensorimotor deficits are a significant barrier to achieving post-stroke independence. Unfortunately, the majority of pre-clinical studies that show improved outcomes in animal stroke models have failed in clinical trials. Pre-clinical studies using non-human primate (NHP) stroke models prior to initiating human trials are a potential step to improving translation from animal studies to clinical trials. Robotic assessment tools represent a quantitative, reliable, and reproducible means to assess reaching behaviour following stroke in both humans and NHPs. We investigated the use of robotic technology to assess sensorimotor impairments in NHPs following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Two cynomolgus macaques underwent transient MCAO for 90 minutes. Approximately 1.5 years following the procedure these NHPs and two non-stroke control monkeys were trained in a reaching task with both arms in the KINARM exoskeleton. This robot permits elbow and shoulder movements in the horizontal plane. The task required NHPs to make reaching movements from a centrally positioned start target to 1 of 8 peripheral targets uniformly distributed around the first target. We analyzed four movement parameters: reaction time, movement time (MT), initial direction error (IDE), and number of speed maxima to characterize sensorimotor deficiencies. We hypothesized reduced performance in these attributes during a neurobehavioural task with the paretic limb of NHPs following MCAO compared to controls. Reaching movements in the non-affected limbs of control and experimental NHPs showed bell-shaped velocity profiles. In contrast, the reaching movements with the affected limbs were highly variable. We found distinctive patterns in MT, IDE, and number of speed peaks between control and experimental monkeys and between limbs of NHPs with MCAO. NHPs with MCAO demonstrated more speed peaks, longer MTs, and greater IDE in their paretic limb compared to controls. These initial results qualitatively match human stroke subjects’ performance, suggesting that robotic neurobehavioural assessment in NHPs with stroke is feasible and could have translational relevance in subsequent human studies. Further studies will be necessary to replicate and expand on these preliminary findings.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectStrokeen_US
dc.subjectNon-Human Primateen_US
dc.subjectTranslational Researchen_US
dc.subjectKINARMen_US
dc.titleRobotic Outcome Assessment in a Non-Human Primate Model of Middle Cerebral Artery Strokeen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeMasteren
dc.contributor.supervisorCook, Douglas Jamesen
dc.contributor.departmentNeuroscience Studiesen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record