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dc.contributor.authorYoumans, Alexandra S.
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2016-05-31 15:21:38.656en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-31T19:51:41Z
dc.date.available2016-05-31T19:51:41Z
dc.date.issued2016-05-31
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/14478
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D, Education) -- Queen's University, 2016-05-31 15:21:38.656en
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation includes two studies. Study 1 is a qualitative case study that describes enactment of the main components of a high fidelity Full-Day Early Learning Kindergarten (FDELK) classroom, specifically play-based learning and teacher-ECE collaboration. Study 2 is a quantitative analysis that investigates how effectively the FDELK program promotes school readiness skills, namely self-regulation, literacy, and numeracy, in Kindergarteners. To describe the main components of an FDELK classroom in Study 1, a sub-sample of four high fidelity case study schools were selected from a larger case study sample. Interview data from these schools’ administrators, educators, parents, and community stakeholders were used to describe how the main components of the FDELK program enabled educators to meet the individual needs of students and promote students’ SR development. In Study 2, hierarchical regression analyses of 32,207 students’ self-regulation, literacy, and numeracy outcomes using 2012 Ontario Early Development Instrument (EDI) data revealed essentially no benefit for students participating in the FDELK program when compared to peers in Half-Day or Alternate-Day Kindergarten programs. Being older and female predicted more positive SR and literacy outcomes. Age and gender accounted for limited variance in numeracy outcomes. Results from both studies suggest that the Ontario Ministry of Education should take steps to improve the quality of the FDELK program by incorporating evidence-based guidelines and goals for play, reducing Kindergarten class sizes to more effectively scaffold learning, and revising curriculum expectations to include a greater focus on SR, literacy, and numeracy skills.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectLiteracyen_US
dc.subjectEarly Learningen_US
dc.subjectNumeracyen_US
dc.subjectPlay-Based Learningen_US
dc.subjectFull-Day Kindergartenen_US
dc.subjectTeacher-ECE Collaborationen_US
dc.subjectSelf-Regulationen_US
dc.titleAn Investigation of the Features and Effectiveness of the Full-Day Early Learning Kindergarten Program in Ontarioen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.Den
dc.contributor.supervisorFreeman, John G.en
dc.contributor.departmentEducationen


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