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dc.contributor.authorHolloway, Jean E.
dc.contributor.authorLamoureux, Scott F.
dc.contributor.authorMontro, Scott N.
dc.contributor.authorLafrenère, Melissa J.
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-16T14:45:09Z
dc.date.available2016-06-16T14:45:09Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-16
dc.identifier.issn1045-6740
dc.identifier.otherDOI: 10.1002/ppp.1870
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/14587
dc.description.abstractPressurised slurries of fine-grained sediment expelled from the base of the active layer have been observed in recent years in the High Arctic. Such mud ejections, however, are poorly understood in terms of how exactly climate and landscape factors determine when and where they occur. Mud ejections at the Cape Bounty Arctic Watershed Observatory, Melville Island, Nunavut, were systematically mapped in 2012 and 2013, and this was combined with observations of mud ejection activity and climatic measurements carried out since 2003. The mud ejections occur late in the melt season during warm years and closely following major rainfall events. High-resolution satellite imagery demonstrates that mud ejections are associated with polar semi-desert vegetative settings, flat or low-sloping terrain and south-facing slopes. The localised occurrence of mud ejections appears to be related to differential soil moisture retention.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectPermafrosten_US
dc.subjectMud Ejectionsen_US
dc.subjectClimateen_US
dc.subjectActive-Layer Dynamicsen_US
dc.subjectRemote Sensingen_US
dc.subjectPermafrost Disturbanceen_US
dc.titleClimate and Terrain Characteristics Linked to Mud Ejection Occurrence in the Canadian High Arcticen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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