Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJaramillo, Graceen
dc.date2016-08-25 19:51:48.346
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-26T15:55:42Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-26
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/14751
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D, Political Studies) -- Queen's University, 2016-08-25 19:51:48.346en
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation focuses on industrial policy in two developing countries: Peru and Ecuador. Informed by comparative historical analysis, it explains how the Import-Substitution Industrialization policies promoted during the 1970s by military administration unravelled in the following 30 years under the guidance of Washington Consensus policies. Positioning political economy in time, the research objectives were two-fold: understanding long-term policy reform patterns, including the variables that conditioned cyclical versus path-dependent dynamics of change and; secondly, investigating the direction and leverage of state institutions supporting the manufacturing sector at the dawn, peak and consolidation of neoliberal discourse in both countries. Three interconnected causal mechanisms explain the divergence of trajectories: institutional legacies, coordination among actors and economic distribution of power. Peru’s long tradition of a minimal state contrasts with the embedded character of Ecuador long tradition of legal protectionism dating back to the Liberal Revolution. Peru’s close policy coordination among stakeholders –state technocrats and business elites- differs from Ecuador’s “winners-take-all” approach for policy-making. Peru’s economic dynamism concentrated in Lima sharply departs from Ecuador’s competitive regional economic leaderships. This dissertation paid particular attention to methodology to understand the intersection between structure and agency in policy change. Tracing primary and secondary sources, as well as key pieces of legislation, became critical to understand key turning points and long-term patterns of change. Open-ended interviews (N=58) with two stakeholder groups (business elites and bureaucrats) compounded the effort to knit motives, discourses, and interests behind this long transition. In order to understand this amount of data, this research build an index of policy intervention as a methodological contribution to assess long patterns of policy change. These findings contribute to the current literature on State-market relations and varieties of capitalism, institutional change, and policy reform.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectindustrial policyen
dc.subjectComparative historical analysisen
dc.subjectEcuadoren
dc.subjectpolitical economyen
dc.subjectPeruen
dc.subjectLatin Americaen
dc.subjectHistorical Institutionalismen
dc.titleThe political economy of industrial policy in Peru and Ecuador: 1980-2010en
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.restricted-thesisI want to maximize the possibilities of publication of the whole monograph.en
dc.description.degreePhDen
dc.contributor.supervisorConaghan, Catherineen
dc.contributor.departmentPolitical Studiesen
dc.embargo.terms1825en
dc.embargo.liftdate2021-08-25
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record