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dc.contributor.authorSaengow, Chaimongkol
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2016-09-14 13:11:34.479en
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-14T22:03:47Z
dc.date.available2016-09-14T22:03:47Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-14
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/14891
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D, Chemical Engineering) -- Queen's University, 2016-09-14 13:11:34.479en
dc.description.abstractWhen plastic pipe is solidified, it proceeds through a long cooling chamber. Inside this chamber, inside the hollow extrudate, the plastic is molten, and this inner surface solidifies last. Sag, the flow due to the self-weight of the molten plastic, then happens in this cooling chamber, and sometimes, thickened regions (called knuckles) arise in the lower quadrants, especially of large diameter thickwalled pipes. To compensate for sag, engineers normally shift the die centerpiece downward. This thesis focuses on the consequences of this decentering. Specifically, when the molten polymer is viscoelastic, as is normally the case, a downward lateral force is exerted on the mandrel. Die eccentricity also affects the downstream axial force on the mandrel. These forces govern how rigidly the mandrel must be attached (normally, on a spider die). We attack this flow problem in eccentric cylindrical coordinates, using the Oldroyd 8-constant constitutive model framework. Specifically, we revise the method of Jones (1964), called polymer process partitioning. We estimate both axial and lateral forces. We develop a corresponding map to help plastics engineers predict the extrudate shape, including extrudate knuckles. From the mass balance over the postdie region, we then predict the shape of the extrudate entering the cooling chamber. We further include expressions for the stresses in the extruded polymer melt. We include detailed dimensional worked examples to show process engineers how to use our results to design pipe dies, and especially to suppress extrudate knuckling.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectOldroyd 8-Constant Fluiden_US
dc.subjectSlumpen_US
dc.subjectFlow between Eccentric Annulusen_US
dc.subjectKnucklingen_US
dc.subjectPlastic Pipe Extrusionen_US
dc.titlePolymer Process Partitioning: Extruding Plastic Pipeen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.Den
dc.contributor.supervisorGiacomin, A. Jeffreyen
dc.contributor.supervisorKolitawong, Chanyuten
dc.contributor.departmentChemical Engineeringen


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