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dc.contributor.authorBinkley, Lisa
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2016-09-27 13:22:05.951en
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-29T23:57:28Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-29
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/15009
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D, Art History) -- Queen's University, 2016-09-27 13:22:05.951en
dc.description.abstractStitching Settler Identities: Canadian Quilts and their Makers, 1800-1880 explores the making, use, and circulation of handmade settler quilts as representation of nineteenth-century women’s social, cultural and economic histories in Canada. An important part of Canadian settlement history is the making and use of handmade quilts in the settler homestead. Handmade coverlets that provided both physical and emotional warmth in the home were a measure of a settler-woman’s careful management of resources and a display of her innovation and creativity. Few settler women recorded their daily experiences; however, most women could sew and quilts offered a method of expression that allowed them to reflect and portray their identities. Thus far, the few studies of quilts have been limited to exhibition catalogues or research that considers a quilt’s aesthetics or its historic significance. While several scholars have called for a reclassification of textile production and needle arts to advance the way in which settler women were viewed as social beings – creating, producing, communicating, and circulating cultural values, most studies on quilts have overlooked a coverlet’s materiality. This study aims to expand the research on quilts as material culture within the context of art history by also considering a quilt’s materiality and when possible, its maker's biography.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectNeedleworken_US
dc.subjectTextilesen_US
dc.subjectSettleren_US
dc.subjectCanadaen_US
dc.subjectMaterial Cultureen_US
dc.subjectWomen's Economiesen_US
dc.subjectIndustrializationen_US
dc.subjectCraften_US
dc.titleStitching Settler Identities: Canadian Quilts and Their Makers, 1800-1880en_US
dc.typethesisen_US
dc.description.restricted-thesisThis thesis is to be restricted while I prepare the manuscript for publication.en
dc.description.degreePh.Den
dc.contributor.supervisorHelland, Janiceen
dc.contributor.departmentArt Historyen
dc.embargo.terms1825en
dc.embargo.liftdate2021-09-28


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