Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCancelliere, Nicole
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2016-09-29 10:55:43.48en
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-01T21:47:48Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/15040
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Neuroscience Studies) -- Queen's University, 2016-09-29 10:55:43.48en
dc.description.abstractThe subfornical organ (SFO) is a critical circumventricular organ involved in the control of cardiovascular and metabolic homeostasis. Despite the abundant literature clearly demonstrating the ability of SFO neurons to sense and respond to a plethora of circulating signals that influence various physiological systems, investigation of how simultaneously sensed signals interact and are integrated in the SFO is lacking. In this study, we use patch clamp techniques to investigate how the traditionally classified ‘cardiovascular’ hormone angiotensin II (ANG), ‘metabolic’ hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) and ‘metabolic’ signal glucose interact and are integrated in the SFO. Sequential bath-application of CCK (10nM) and ANG (10nM) onto dissociated SFO neurons revealed that: 63% of responsive SFO neurons depolarized to both CCK & ANG; 25% depolarized to ANG only; and 12% hyperpolarized to CCK only. We next investigated the effects of glucose by incubating and recording neurons in either hypo-, normo- or hyperglycemic conditions for a minimum of 24 hours and comparing the proportions of responses to ANG (n=55) or CCK (n=83) application in each condition. A hyperglycemic environment was associated with a larger proportion of depolarizing responses to ANG (X2, p<0.05), and a smaller proportion of depolarizing responses along with a larger proportion of hyperpolarizing responses to CCK (X2, p<0.01). These data demonstrate that SFO neurons excited by CCK are also excited by ANG, suggesting that CCK may influence fluid intake or blood pressure via the SFO, complementary to the well-understood actions of ANG at this site. Additionally, the demonstration that glucose environment affects the responsiveness of neurons to both these hormones highlights the ability of SFO neurons to integrate multiple metabolic and cardiovascular signals to affect transmission of information from the circulation to the brain, which has important implications for this structure’s critical role regulation of autonomic function.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectintegrationen_US
dc.subjectelectrophysiologyen_US
dc.subjecthormone signalsen_US
dc.subjectcardiovascular regulationen_US
dc.subjectblood-brain barrieren_US
dc.subjectcircumventricular organen_US
dc.subjectmetabolic regulationen_US
dc.subjectsubfornical organen_US
dc.subjectangiotensinen_US
dc.subjectcholecystokininen_US
dc.titleSubfornical organ neurons integrate cardiovascular and metabolic signalsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.restricted-thesisLarge sections of this thesis have been copied from a primary research paper I have written and submitted to a journal for publication.en
dc.description.degreeMasteren
dc.contributor.supervisorFerguson, Alastair V.en
dc.contributor.departmentNeuroscience Studiesen
dc.embargo.terms1825en
dc.embargo.liftdate2021-09-30


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record