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dc.contributor.authorWard, Elenaen
dc.date2008-09-25 19:38:33.9
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-27T21:11:40Z
dc.date.available2008-09-27T21:11:40Z
dc.date.issued2008-09-27T21:11:40Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/1520
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Education) -- Queen's University, 2008-09-25 19:38:33.9en
dc.description.abstractThis study examined mathematics anxiety among elementary teacher candidates, and to what extent it interacted with the modality principle under various degrees of learner-control. The experiment involved a sample of 186 elementary teacher candidates learning from eight versions of a computer program on division with fractions. The eight versions varied in modality of presentation (diagrams with narration, or diagrams with written text), control of pacing (pacing was controlled by either the learner or the system), and control of sequence (sequence was controlled by either the learner or the system). A pre-test, post-test, demographic questionnaire, subjective measure of mental effort, and the Abbreviated Math Anxiety Survey were also administered. This study revealed that mathematics anxiety was significantly positively correlated with mental effort, and significantly negatively correlated with engagement, pre-test and post-test scores. Additionally, a modality x pacing interaction was observed for both high prior knowledge and low mathematics-anxious students. Under system-pacing, the modality effect was observed, and these students achieved higher far transfer scores when learning from the diagrams and narration modality condition. However, under learner-pacing, the modality effect reversed, and high prior knowledge and low mathematics-anxious students performed better on far transfer scores when learning from the diagrams and written text modality condition. Low prior knowledge, and highly mathematics-anxious students performed poorly in all treatment conditions. Additional interactions involving sequence-control, and a four-way interaction involving prior knowledge, modality, sequence-control, and pacing were also uncovered. The results from this study demonstrate that prior knowledge and mathematics anxiety have a complex relationship with the effectiveness of the format of instruction, and the design of instructional materials needs to take into account these individual differences.en
dc.format.extent835120 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectMathematics Anxietyen
dc.subjectModality Principleen
dc.subjectMultimedia Learningen
dc.subjectCognitive Load Theoryen
dc.titleAn Examination of the Effects of Mathematics Anxiety, Modality, and Learner-Control on Teacher Candidates in Multimedia Learning Environmentsen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeM.Ed.en
dc.contributor.supervisorColgan, Lyndaen
dc.contributor.supervisorKirby, John R.en
dc.contributor.departmentEducationen
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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