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dc.contributor.authorSarson, Leahen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-06T21:12:34Z
dc.date.available2017-01-06T21:12:34Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/15315
dc.description.abstractInternational Relations theory would predict that central governments, with their considerable material resources, would be unlikely to face a challenge from a substate government. However, substate governments, and particularly Indigenous governments, are pushing back against central government control in both domestic and international spheres. Indigenous governments are leveraging their local mining sectors to realize their interests and express local identities—interests and identities that may not be congruent with those of the central government. Applying the case study of the resource extraction sector in Canada, this thesis asks: under what conditions are substate governments able to challenge the authority of central governments in the international arena? Canada’s reliance on the global extractive resource sector is a major driver of its international policy preferences, but the increased engagement of Indigenous governments in the sector challenges the control of the federal government. Focusing on the resource extraction sectors in British Columbia, Saskatchewan, and Ontario, this thesis argues that there is a mutually reinforcing relationship between Indigenous governments’ international engagement and their domestic autonomy; both challenge the parameters of state authority. Both force the state to respond to claims of control from multiple sites and to clarify convoluted policy environments. A confluence of factors—including increased Indigenous connections to the globalized economy, new Canadian regulatory frameworks, and recent Supreme Court of Canada cases regarding Indigenous lands—have all altered the space in which Indigenous governments in Canada participate in the resource extraction sector and produce overlapping or multilevel governance structures. This thesis demonstrates that Indigenous international engagement entrenches the authority and political legitimacy manifest in Indigenous governments’ insistence on equitable and horizontal negotiations in Canada’s lucrative resource extraction sector. A cumulative process occurs in which domestic and international expressions of political autonomy reinforce each other, produce further opportunities to express authority in both environments, and trouble the state’s capacity to fully realize its international policy preferences.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectInternational Relationsen
dc.subjectCanadian Foreign Policyen
dc.subjectIndigenousen
dc.subjectResource Extractionen
dc.subjectDiplomacyen
dc.subjectMiningen
dc.subjectCanadaen
dc.titleStrategic Diplomacies: Indigenous Governance, International Politics, and Natural Resources in Canadaen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreePhDen
dc.contributor.supervisorNossal, Kim Richarden
dc.contributor.departmentPolitical Studiesen
dc.embargo.termsI would like to publish the dissertation in several publication outlets and would therefore like to restrict its availability. My supervisor has given his permission for this restriction.en
dc.embargo.liftdate2022-01-03T02:14:06Z
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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