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dc.contributor.authorAmato, Lucio Roger
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2009-04-09 15:30:59.865en
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-23T21:08:48Z
dc.date.available2009-04-23T21:08:48Z
dc.date.issued2009-04-23T21:08:48Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/1775
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Civil Engineering) -- Queen's University, 2009-04-09 15:30:59.865en
dc.description.abstractThe deterioration of prestressed concrete structures due to corrosion is a costly problem. This problem is accelerated in cold weather climates where de-icing salts are used. These salts accelerate the corrosion of the steel tendons greatly reducing the service life of the structures and leading to constant costly repairs. Recent research has shown composite materials such as Fibre Reinforced Polymers (FRP) to be suitable alternatives to steel, providing similar strength without being susceptible to electrochemical corrosion. Carbon FRP in particular has great promise for prestressed applications, showing resistance to corrosion in environments that might be encountered in concrete and experiencing less relaxation than steel. This thesis outlines the testing and implementation of a post-tensioned system that uses CFRP tendons to replace corroded, unbonded post-tensioned steel tendons. This system was then implemented in a parking garage in downtown Toronto. To the author’s knowledge, this is the first example of an unbonded, post-tensioned tendon replacement using FRP tendons. The system used split wedge anchors designed specifically for CFRP tendons at the University of Waterloo. The dead end was anchored by directly bonding the tendon to the concrete slab. Overall, the system was shown to work and provide a durable solution for unbonded post-tensioning systems. The CFRP tendon was successfully inserted in the opening left by the removal of the corroded tendon and stressed. It was found that the current anchorage configuration experienced large load losses of up to 60 % during the transfer. Changing the orientation of the anchor was found to reduce the load lost to a range of 1 % to 9 %.en
dc.format.extent4511239 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectCFRP Tendonsen
dc.subjectPost-Tensioningen
dc.subjectField Applicationen
dc.subjectUnbondeden
dc.subjectPrestresseden
dc.titleCFRP Tendons For The Repair Of Post-Tensioned, Ubonded Concrete Buildingsen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.degreeMasteren
dc.contributor.supervisorGreen, Mark F.en
dc.contributor.supervisorMacDougall, Colinen
dc.contributor.departmentCivil Engineeringen


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