Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMonte, Jonasen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-30T16:12:35Z
dc.date.available2017-09-30T16:12:35Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/22799
dc.description.abstractThis thesis discusses some of the critiques of modern moral theories (deontology, utilitarianism, and virtue ethics) posed by Elizabeth Anscombe, Michael Stocker, Bernard Williams, and Susan Wolf. It focuses on Stocker’s challenge that when subjects try to act on such theories they become self-effacing in that they create a divide between one’s reasons and one’s motives. This study argues that in consequence such modern ethical theories have serious difficulties in dealing with the issues these philosophers raise. Nevertheless, while valuing their contributions, I attempt to formulate a more plausible solution to the problems of morality systems. In particular, I argue that these approaches have not dealt adequately with the following questions: If morality systems are repressive and exclude the personal life, why are they still so influential? Why have not people rid themselves of systems that act to the detriment of ethical life? To address such issues, with the intention of understanding how morality systems operate, I turn to Michel Foucault’s concept of disciplinary power. After discussing the problem of the pervasiveness of modern ethical theories, I conclude by making a case for Foucault’s ethics of the care of the self as a way of addressing the problems raised by Stocker and others.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectMoralityen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectMorality Systemsen
dc.subjectCare of the Selfen
dc.subjectG.E.M. Anscombeen
dc.subjectMichael Stockeren
dc.subjectBernard Williamsen
dc.subjectSusan Wolfen
dc.subjectMichael Foucaulten
dc.subjectModern Ethical Theoriesen
dc.subjectMalady of Spiriten
dc.subjectKantianismen
dc.subjectUtilitarianismen
dc.subjectVirtue Ethicsen
dc.subjectConstitution of the Subjecten
dc.titleThe Ethics of Care of the Self as Resistance to a “Peculiar Institution”en
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeM.A.en
dc.contributor.supervisorSypnowich, Christineen
dc.contributor.departmentPhilosophyen
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record