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dc.contributor.authorLucas, Jennifer
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-27T17:18:46Z
dc.date.available2018-04-27T17:18:46Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/24060
dc.description.abstractThe Canadianization movement emerged in the late 1960s and early 1970s from Canadian universities and has been treated as a brief moment in the historiography of Canada’s 1960s, post-secondary education in Canada and broader Americanization of Canadian society. The historical figureheads of the movement, Robin Mathews and James Steele, advocated for the hiring of Canadian faculty and increased Canadian content in universities across Canada. When a broader lens is used to view the Canadianization movement, it becomes apparent that the movement was the beginning of efforts to develop Canadian Studies as an interdisciplinary project in Canadian universities. Canadianizing efforts examined course content, curricula and personnel (including faculty, graduate students, and administrators) in order to foster a unique Canadian identity through the promotion of Canadian education. These studies were the origins of a number of Canadian university hiring policies and practices in place today. The Canadianization movement needs to be considered a broader movement–both chronologically and outside the involvement of Mathews and Steele–because, when it is expanded to encompass other organizations and reports that supported explicit Canadianization goals, such as the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT), the Committee for an Independent Canada, the Symons’s Report, and David Cameron’s Taking Stock, the movement’s importance to Canadian education and Canadian identity becomes readily apparent.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectCanadianizationen_US
dc.subjectAmericanizationen_US
dc.subjectCanadian Studiesen_US
dc.subjectCanadian Universitiesen_US
dc.subjectUniversitiesen_US
dc.titleTo Be North American but Not American: The Transformation of Canadian Studies and Canadian Universitiesen_US
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
dc.contributor.supervisorBrison, Jeffrey
dc.contributor.departmentHistoryen_US
dc.embargo.termsI would like to restrict my thesis because I will be building upon this research for my PhD. I am hoping to publish a number of articles from this project and would prefer this version to be restricted from public view for the five year period.en_US
dc.embargo.liftdate2023-04-26T21:34:15Z


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