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dc.contributor.authorSauve, Drew
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-04T15:45:33Z
dc.date.available2018-05-04T15:45:33Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/24138
dc.description.abstractThe ability of individuals to change breeding time is predicted to be an important aspect of adapting to climate change. Changes in breeding time could occur through either behavioural adjustment of breeding time or evolution. To date, few studies have investigated these processes in Arctic environments, where temperature is rising at a greater rate than the global mean. I evaluated the contribution of behavioural adjustment of breeding time and evolution to changes in breeding time associated with annual variation in snow melt and female breeding age over a 42-year dataset from an Arctic population of Black Guillemots (Cepphus grylle mandtii). I used an Animal Model to decompose the variance observed in breeding time and I used three fitness metrics in a bivariate Animal Model to estimate selection on clutch initiation DOY. Finally, I examined the temporal trend in the genetic component of variation in clutch initiation date to determine if evolution contributed to the shift in breeding time. During the study period mean clutch initiation date advanced 7.8 days, snow melt date advanced 7.6 days, and the average female breeding age increased by 4.7 years. Earlier clutch initiation was associated with experienced mothers, earlier snow melt, and higher fitness. Individuals advanced clutch initiation at different rates as they aged but responded similarly to variation in snow melt. Heritability of clutch initiation date was negligible (h2 = 0.04, 95% CI [0.00-0.11]), and there was no evidence of evolution contributing to the change in breeding time. My results suggest that covariation between clutch initiation date and fitness is driven by environmental, but not genetic factors. Consequently, changes of breeding time in Black Guillemots are likely driven by plastic behavioural adjustment with limited potential for evolutionary change.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectPhenotypic Plasticityen_US
dc.subjectEcologyen_US
dc.subjectClimate Changeen_US
dc.subjectEvolutionen_US
dc.subjectQuantitative Geneticsen_US
dc.subjectSeabirdsen_US
dc.titlePhenotypic Plasticity Drives Phenological Change in Mandt's Black Guillemot (Cepphus Grylle MandtII)en_US
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.supervisorFriesen, Vicki
dc.contributor.departmentBiologyen_US


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