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dc.contributor.authorunknown artisten
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-07T15:54:07Z
dc.date.available2018-05-07T15:54:07Z
dc.date.createdc. 1330-5en
dc.identifier.citationMargrit Lisner, Holzkruzifixe in Florenz und in der Toskana (Munich: Bruckmann, 1970), 33-4; Megan Holmes, The Miraculous Image in Renaissance Florence (New Haven: Yale UP, 2013), 47-9, 152-6.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/24201
dc.descriptionSan Michele Visdomini, Florenceen
dc.description.abstractThis large polychromed wood crucifix is first documented being carried in procession in 1335, but the devotions with which it became closely associated were those of the Bianchi in 1399. The Bianchi were a lay devotional movement that swept across Italy. People wore white, performed penitential acts, sang songs, and went on great processions carrying crucifixes in an attempt to escape God's wrath (in the form of the plague). Many of these crucifixes were recorded to have performed miracles --speaking, moving, spouting blood, healing, etc., and so all of the Bianchi crucifixes gained an aura of the miraculous, whether that specific object had performed a miracle or no. Photograph(s) licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licenseen
dc.format.mediumPainted wooden
dc.subjectChristen
dc.subjectCrucifixen
dc.subjectCrossen
dc.subjectJesusen
dc.titleCrucifixen
dc.typeimageen
dc.rights.holderUna D'Eliaen
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licenseen


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