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dc.contributor.authorJameson, Alec
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-05T18:15:30Z
dc.date.available2018-07-05T18:15:30Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/24298
dc.description.abstractThe Daniell cell (Zn-Cu battery) offers several potential advantages over current battery technologies, but is held back by the problems of copper ion (Cu2+) crossover. We resolved this through employing a selective cation exchange membrane as the separator. The membrane allows sodium ions (Na+) to maintain ion transfer between the zinc and copper half-cells while preventing Cu2+ from entering the zinc half-cell. We observed that at equal electrolyte conductivities, the potential of zinc deposition is larger in sulphate electrolytes than in chloride electrolytes. Zinc nitrate electrolytes lead to the formation of zinc oxide (ZnO) which passivated the zinc electrode surface. In copper electrolytes, sulphate and nitrate electrolytes possessed nearly equal potentials for electrodeposition. Chloride-based copper electrolytes possessed large negative potentials for copper deposition due to the stabilization effect of chloride (Cl-) on the monovalent Cu+ intermediate species. Tafel analyses revealed that zinc deposition and dissolution had near identical kinetics in sulphate and chloride electrolytes when they were present at equal conductivites. We also observed through cyclic voltammetry and Tafel analyses that there is a small increase in the kinetics of both the zinc and copper electrochemical reactions as the active ion concentration was increased. Low levels of Cu2+ did not have a significant effect on the zinc electrode performance, but at 1000 ppm concentration of Cu2+, the overpotentials for zinc deposition and dissolution were much larger. It was observed at open-circuit that at low concentrations of catholyte, only very little Cu2+ was able to cross the membrane. Recharging the battery without any Na+ in the electrolyte was not possible. When 1.0 M sodium sulphate (Na2SO4) was added to the catholyte the battery was able to be successfully cycled 100 times with no noticeable losses in performance and only small amounts of Cu2+ crossing over. High coulombic efficiencies were observed at low current drains.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectZincen_US
dc.subjectCopperen_US
dc.subjectBatteryen_US
dc.subjectSeparatoren_US
dc.titleA Rechargeable Zn-Cu Battery Using a Selective Cation Exchange Membraneen_US
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.degreeMaster of Applied Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.supervisorDominik, Barz
dc.contributor.departmentChemical Engineeringen_US
dc.embargo.termsWe are currently working on attaining a patent, and so we would like to restrict the thesis if possible. For more details you can talk to me at 11ajj4@queensu.ca or my supervisor Dominik Barz at dominik.barz@queensu.caen_US
dc.embargo.liftdate2023-07-05T16:21:01Z
dc.embargo.liftdate2023-07-05T17:27:09Z


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