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dc.contributor.authorCarneiro, Sarah
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-05T19:33:35Z
dc.date.available2018-07-05T19:33:35Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/24304
dc.description.abstractI analyse the Sixties Scoop through the lens of Indigenous and feminist scholarship to contextualize the Scoop within the specific historical, political, and cultural moment of the postwar Canadian “welfare state” during which it was occurring. In the 1960s and 1970s, Canada was attempting to foment a unique “Canadian” identity that became increasingly tied to the values of cultural pluralism and tolerance. During this time, both the state and Indigenous activism questioned where and how Indigenous people would “fit” (or would not fit) into the burgeoning Canadian cultural “mosaic” of the late 20th century. Through an analysis of the 1966/67 federal government report, A Survey of the Contemporary Indians of Canada: Economic, Political, and Educational Needs and Policies (The Hawthorn Report), alongside articles from the Journal – Ontario Association of Children’s Aid Societies (JOACAS), mostly authored by social workers about reserve communities in Northern Ontario during the 1960s and 1970s, I aim to illuminate the intimate relationship between capitalist development, settler colonialism, and patriarchy in postwar Canada. I argue that one of the causes of the Scoop was the inability of governments and Children’s Aid Societies (CAS) administrators and frontline service providers to conceptualize the mass apprehension of Indigenous children from their homes during the 1960s to 1980s as holistically and inextricably connected to the social, political, cultural, and economic aspects of Indigenous people’s lives.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectIndigenousen_US
dc.subjectFirst Nationsen_US
dc.subjectCanadaen_US
dc.subjectChild welfareen_US
dc.subjectSixties Scoopen_US
dc.subjectPovertyen_US
dc.subjectPolicyen_US
dc.subjectPostwaren_US
dc.subjectThe Hawthorn Reporten_US
dc.subjectSocial worken_US
dc.titlePolicy, Poverty, and Indigenous Child Welfare: Revisiting the Sixties Scoopen_US
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
dc.contributor.supervisorLittle, Margaret
dc.contributor.departmentGender Studiesen_US


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