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dc.contributor.authorAndrea della Robbiaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-06T18:09:25Z
dc.date.available2018-09-06T18:09:25Z
dc.date.createdc. 1479en_US
dc.identifier.citationAllan Marquand, Andrea della Robbia and His Atelier (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1922), 1: 52-54; John Pope-Hennessy, "Thoughts on Andrea della Robbia," Apollo 109 (1979), 176-97; Giancarlo Gentilini, Giancarlo Gentilini, I Della Robbia: La scultura invetriata nel Rinascimento (Florence: Cantini, 1992), 1:209; Giancarlo Gentilini, "The Glazed Sculpture of the Verna Sanctuary," trans. Judith Landry,�FMR English Edition 67 (1994): 83-104; Andrea Muzzi, "Temi religiosi nella decorazione di Andrea della Robbia per la Chiesa Maggiore della Verna: Appunti sul metodo di studio," in Alvaro Cacciotti, ed., Itinerarium Montis Alvernae: Atti del Convegno di Studi Storici, La Verna 5-8 Maggio 1999 (Florence, 2000), 307-17;�Stephanie Miller, "Andrea della Robbia and his La Verna Altarpieces: Context and Interpretation" (PhD diss., Indiana University, 2003), 117-39; Fiamma Domestici, "Frammenti di latteo cielo: Il ciclo robbiano alvernino," in Nicoletta Baldini, ed., Altro monte non ha pi� santo il mondo: Storia, architettura ed arte alla Verna fra il XV ed il XVI secolo (Firenze: Edizioni Studi Francescani, 2014), 135-48.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/24794
dc.descriptionBrizi Chapel, Chiesa Maggiore, La Vernaen_US
dc.description.abstractAndrea della Robbia's glazed terracotta Incarnation of c.1479 adorns the altar of the Brizi Chapel in the Chiesa Maggiore of La Verna. Enshrined within a stone tempietto on the right side of the church, it forms a visual pair with Andrea's Annunciation altarpiece across the nave. Both images celebrate the Virgin's crucial role in Christ's existence. Here, the Virgin's head, turned down to contemplate the body of her Child, is located at the very center of the composition, while the inscription painted in glaze below the image draws further attention to the mother of God: "The word is made flesh through the Virgin Mary." The words expand upon those in the Gospel of John (1.14) by foregrounding the Virgin as the source of Christ's bodily incarnation. While the altarpiece adopts the Della Robbia's signature blue-white bichromy, there is subtle variation in the white tones used for the bodies: the angels and God the Father are glazed in a pure white, while the Virgin and her son, in the foreground, are set apart through the use of a warmer, more yellow tone. As Miller has noted, this difference in tone serves to distinguish the earthly bodies from the more heavenly realm. Andrea's use of glaze also emphasizes the close physical bond between the Virgin and Child, expressing in visual terms the notion of shared flesh signaled by the words beneath the scene. Photograph(s) licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.en_US
dc.format.extent220 x 170 cm.en_US
dc.format.mediumGlazed terracottaen_US
dc.subjectIncarnationen_US
dc.subjectNativityen_US
dc.subjectVirginen_US
dc.subjectChristen_US
dc.subjectGod the Fatheren_US
dc.subjectAngelsen_US
dc.titleThe Incarnationen_US
dc.typeImageen_US
dc.rights.holderRachel Boyden_US
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licenseen_US


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