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dc.contributor.authorAlford, Sarah
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-29T15:25:16Z
dc.date.available2018-09-29T15:25:16Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/24899
dc.description.abstract“Art Botany in Nineteenth-Century Design Reform, 1830-1865” investigates the relationship between developments in botanical morphology and the increasingly codified principles of design reform, the state-sponsored movement to improve the competitiveness of British manufacturing by establishing design as a professional field. The literature of design reform tends to conclude that the movement’s main aim was to raise the quality of manufactured items and improve consumer taste. However, my study builds upon the few analyses that contend the theory of design reform became integrated into the principles of natural philosophy and industrial art, which were then folded together into a uniquely nineteenth-century conception of the vital affinities between natural and industrial ideals, a world in which the design principle “form follows function” is connected to botanical science and idealist philosophy. My thesis brings together the natural philosophy of design together with its material objects. While reformers aimed to produce objects that were ideal, based on a priori patterns or types, their designs were also meant to be popular and to do concrete work in the social realm. I investigate this tension between the ideal and the real by drawing upon dialectical models of material culture to examine four objects in relation to the stated aims of design reform and within the context of nineteenth-century natural science and liberal ideologies.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectdesign reform movementen_US
dc.subjectnineteenth-century design historyen_US
dc.subjectbotanical illustrationen_US
dc.subjectSarah Drakeen_US
dc.subjectJohn Lindleyen_US
dc.subjectWilliam Dyceen_US
dc.subjectRichard Redgraveen_US
dc.subjectChristopher Dresseren_US
dc.subjectOwen Jonesen_US
dc.titleArt Botany in Nineteenth-Century Design Reform, 1830-1865en_US
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.degreeDoctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.contributor.supervisorHelland, Janice
dc.contributor.departmentArt Historyen_US
dc.embargo.termsYes, please restrict this thesis for 5 years. I plan to publish it as a book.en_US
dc.embargo.liftdate2023-09-24T19:26:03Z


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