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dc.contributor.authorShahalizad Namin, Afshin
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-04T19:34:00Z
dc.date.available2019-02-04T19:34:00Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/25973
dc.description.abstractOrganic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have gained a tremendous amount of interest, due to their applications in display and solid-state lighting technologies. This interest mainly arises from the easy and inexpensive manufacturing processes for the fabrication of lightweight, transparent, flexible, and large-area devices. While OLEDs have now reached the stage of commercialization, there are still some serious issues associated with exciton-exciton and exciton-polaron annihilation mechanisms, which reduce their efficiency particularly under the high current densities required to achieve a high level of brightness. This phenomenon is known as efficiency roll-off. On the other hand, since most luminescent organic semiconductors are in principle four-level lasing systems, color-tunable and easy-to-manufacture optically pumped organic solid-sate lasers (OSLs) have attracted a lot of attention, due to their applications in biological sensing, spectroscopy, and data communication. However, highly demanded portable electrically driven continuous-wave (CW) OSLs (organic diode lasers) have not been realized to date. This is mainly because of the above-mentioned efficiency roll-off issue under the high current densities required to achieve lasing threshold in OLEDs. Visible-emitting trivalent lanthanide ions (Ln3+) are promising emitters for OLED applications. They are also known for their excellent lasing properties, owing to their long excited-state lifetimes, favoring population inversion in optically pumped plastic lasers and amplifiers. Furthermore, near infrared (NIR)-emitting trivalent lanthanide ions are important emitters in telecommunication applications in the 900-1600 nm spectral range. Despite the fact that lanthanide-based emitters have been studied in the NIR-emitting OLEDs, their efficiency is still much lower than in their visible-emitting counterparts. Moreover, like other types of OLED, lanthanide-based devices suffer from the aforementioned efficiency roll-off mechanisms. In the present thesis, we show enhanced efficiency from solution-processed NIR-emitting lanthanide-based OLEDs. We also demonstrate unprecedented low efficiency roll-off characteristics in both visible and NIR-emitting lanthanide-based devices.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectOrganic Light-Emitting Diodesen_US
dc.subjectLanthanide Complexen_US
dc.subjectEfficiency Roll-Offen_US
dc.subjectNear Infrared Electroluminescenceen_US
dc.titleSuppression of the Efficiency Roll-Off Characteristics in Solution-Processed Lanthanide-based Organic Light-Emitting Diodesen_US
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeDoctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.contributor.supervisorNunzi, Jean-Michel
dc.contributor.supervisorGeorges Sabat, Ribal
dc.contributor.departmentPhysics, Engineering Physics and Astronomyen_US
dc.embargo.termsI want to submit the results presented in Chapter 4 to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. However, I still need to implement more experiments and provide a better reasoning for the phenomenon that I have reported in Chapter 4. Because those results are very important, I do not want to disclose them at the moment. My supervisor has assented to the restriction of my thesis.en_US
dc.embargo.liftdate2024-02-04T07:43:22Z


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