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dc.contributor.authorBortolotti, Jaimie
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-29T21:51:00Z
dc.date.available2019-07-29T21:51:00Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/26441
dc.description.abstractClosely related species interact often, typically competitively, aggressively, and asymmetrically, with a consistent dominance hierarchy among species. Competition for resources appears to be a rate-limiting step in diversification, but beyond this, we know little about the ecological role of aggression in facilitating or constraining the coexistence of species due to the difficulty in observing natural interactions. To examine how closely related species in a dominance hierarchy aggressively interact, and how those interactions may facilitate coexistence, we documented vocalizations of Song (Melospiza melodia) and Swamp (M. georgiana) sparrows during natural and simulated territory settlement to answer the question: How does vocal behaviour of a dominant species change when first faced with a subordinate competitor on shared breeding territory? Though sample sizes were too low for statistical testing, we saw slightly increased rates of “Swamp Sparrow-like” songs sung by Song Sparrows in relation to Swamp Sparrow presence, as well as trill syllable lengths of Song Sparrow songs approaching average lengths of Swamp Sparrow trill syllables. These trends may suggest syllable sharing or vocal shifts in Song Sparrows as a response to Swamp Sparrow competitors – this vocal convergence may be beneficial in mediating conflicts over shared resources. We also provide novel descriptions of Swamp Sparrow behaviour during settlement on territories overlapping Song Sparrows. Further descriptions of vocal interactions can inform how closely related species interact aggressively, and will contribute to our understanding of how aggression might relate to coexistence on shared territories.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectbiodiversityen_US
dc.subjectspecies coexistenceen_US
dc.subjectanimal communicationen_US
dc.titleVocal behaviour of Song and Swamp sparrows upon arrival on shared breeding groundsen_US
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.supervisorMartin, Paul
dc.contributor.departmentBiologyen_US


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