Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGhazimoradi, Shadi
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-19T21:10:04Z
dc.date.available2019-09-19T21:10:04Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/26593
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines the ways that Iranian women’s writing deployed and reshaped the life narrative form to suit the social milieu of early twentieth-century Iran. In terms of scope, this project examines British women’s travelogues written between the 1890s and 1920s as well as writings by Iranian women from the same time period. This genealogical framework can, I argue, inform contemporary transnational feminist debates in light of the growing marketability of Middle Eastern women’s life narratives in the Western literary market. Chapter 2 explores the dual work that representations of Iranian womanhood performed in British women’s travelogues in terms of both documenting the Oriental Other and relationally defining the self. As this chapter shall discuss, to the female British travelers writing between the 1890s and 1920s, the travelogue – which occupied an important place in England’s colonial project – provided ample opportunity for self-exploration. In this context, representations of the Iranian Other came to serve as a counterpoint against which the narrator’s image of an autonomous, liberated self could be textually enhanced. Chapter 3 analyzes Astarābādī’s Ma’āyib-i Rijāl (1894) and the memoir of Tāj us-Saltanih (c. 1914), both of which were autobiographical and drew upon the author’s personal life experiences as grounds from which to broach broader social issues such as women’s rights and reform. This chapter illustrates how the textual and ideological ambivalences of Tāj’s memoir were rooted in the growing influence of Eurocentric prejudices that promulgated cultural misrepresentations of Iran as backward and corrupt. Chapter 4 is divided into two parts. Part 1 explores the ways that the early women’s journals of the 1910s legitimized women’s rights to publication by adopting the eugenic elements of Iran’s nationalist discourses and emphasizing the role that women would play in the modernization of the nation. Part 2 examines how (both male and female) contributors to the late-1920s journal Peyk-i Sa’ādat-i Nisvān adopted the rhetorical potentials of the first-person narrative form to address collective issues of reform and national progress. As this chapter demonstrates, the strategic use of women’s narratives alerts us to the potential limits of the “genuine” use of the first-person voice.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectLife writingen_US
dc.subjectTravelogueen_US
dc.subjectWomenen_US
dc.subjectQajar Iranen_US
dc.titleWriting the Other, Writing the Self: British Travelogues and Iranian Women’s Life Writing, 1890s-1920sen_US
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeDoctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.contributor.supervisorBongie, Chris
dc.contributor.departmentEnglish Language and Literatureen_US
dc.embargo.termsRestricting in order to publish the thesis chapters in the coming years.en_US
dc.embargo.liftdate2024-09-19T15:30:37Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record