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dc.contributor.authorMooney, Kaylaen
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-20T21:59:23Z
dc.date.available2019-09-20T21:59:23Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/26596
dc.description.abstractPersistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD) is characterized by sensations of physiological genital sexual arousal that occurs in the absence of subjective feelings of sexual desire. Although partner factors have been examined in prior research among other conditions affecting the genital region and sexual response, to date no research has focused on the interpersonal context within which PGAD occurs. There are gaps in the current literature on (1) the relationship, sexual, and psychological well-being of individuals with PGAD who are in a relationship, (2) whether individuals disclose their symptoms to romantic partners, and (3) whether interpersonal variables (such as partner responses, symptom disclosure, and catastrophizing) are related to relationship adjustment and symptom severity. Seventy-six individuals (N = 62 women, N = 10 men, N = 2 Non-Binary, N = 1 Two-Spirit) with symptoms of persistent genital arousal (PGA), as well as 76 age- and sex-matched controls participated in a one-time anonymous online survey. Individuals with PGA reported significantly lower relationship and sexual satisfaction, greater sexual distress, and more symptoms of depression and anxiety compared to controls. Over three-quarters (85.5%) of the PGA sample disclosed their symptoms to their partners in some way. Greater supportive partner responses and lower symptom catastrophizing were related to better relationship adjustment among participants with PGA. Greater symptom catastrophizing also predicted greater PGA symptom severity. Partner responses were not related to PGA symptom severity. Results of the current study suggest that when one member of a couple experiences symptoms of PGA, there may be associated consequences for relationship, sexual, and psychological well-being. Although interpersonal factors have been linked to symptom severity in chronic pain and genital pain conditions, the results of the current study suggest that interpersonal factors may play a slightly different role in PGA symptom experiences and in the conceptualization of PGAD more broadly. Results and implications are discussed in the context of interpersonal models of sexual and relationship functioning.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectSexualityen
dc.subjectGenital arousalen
dc.subjectRelationshipsen
dc.titleThe influence of persistent genital arousal (PGA) on romantic relationshipsen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeM.Sc.en
dc.contributor.supervisorPukall, Carolineen
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen
dc.embargo.termsDr. Pukall and I wish to publish the work without infringing on copyright law.en
dc.embargo.liftdate2024-09-20T18:31:28Z
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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